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  • Drafting at 30th

    So what do you think of Kyle Muller at 30? Too high or too low?

  • #2
    Based on mock draft and ranking, I think Kyle Muller at #30 is about right. Doug Brocail angry about coaches not taking proper care of amateur pitches mentions a 134 pitch game and a 123 pitch game in May for Muller. This suggests the Rangers keep eyes on him.


    Keith Law 3.0:

    Taylor Trammell, OF
    Mount Paran Christian (Kennesaw, Georgia)

    The prevailing belief is that the Rangers will do what they did two years ago when they didn't have a first-rounder but picked 30th overall: take a high-ceiling high school player. The guy they took in 2014, right-hander Luis Ortiz, is now pitching in Double-A at age 20.

    Keith Law 2.0:

    Bryan Reynolds, OF
    Vanderbilt

    I could see the Rangers taking someone like Trammell or Mendoza, two high-risk, high-reward high school athletes. Reynolds is a college guy who has more tools than your typical college hitter, with power and the potential to stay in center field.

    Keith Law 1.0:

    Josh Lowe, 3B/RHP, Pope High School (Marietta, Georgia)

    Baseball America's latest:

    Will Benson, OF: Texas has many options with which to continue its decade-long trend of aggressively pursuing toolsy prep hitters. | Video

    Jim Callis, MLB.com

    Taylor Trammell, OF, Mount Paran Christian School (Kennesaw, Ga.)
    It's always a safe guess to give Texas a high-ceiling athlete, and Trammell certainly fits the bill as the Georgia Class A football player of the year. Other possibilities in that vein include Lowe, Benson and Florida outfielder Buddy Reed.

    http://sportsday.dallasnews.com/texa...nlty-can-watch



    The Jesuit College Prep (Dallas) baseball team photo Monday became even more of a memorable souvenir for senior pitcher Kyle Muller when Texas Rangers ace Cole Hamels ducked into the frame and handed Muller the 2015-16 Gatorade National Baseball Player of the Year trophy.

    “This is overwhelming,” said Muller, 18, a Texas signee who is projected as an early round pick in this week’s Major League Baseball draft. “I’m just very thankful to my teammates and coaches and my family, of course. It’s thrilling and I’m so glad to be part of the Gatorade family.”

    The 6-foot-7, 245-pound left-handed pitcher and outfielder led the Rangers to a 34-8-2 record and the Class 6A Region 2 title. Muller owns an 8-0 record on the mound with a 0.46 ERA and 133 strikeouts, surrendering just 26 hits and issuing only 15 walks in 76 innings. The southpaw has hurled five shutouts and fired two no-hitters to post a WHIP of 0.54 entering the 6A state semifinals, scheduled for June 10.

    http://usatodayhss.com/2016/kyle-mul...er-of-the-year
    Last edited by mingjungtc; 06-06-2016, 11:14 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      This year has a surprisingly deep class of catchers available at the college and high school level. Many of the top catching prospects have questions about their defense that may require them to move off the position, but I suspect teams will give them a longer leash given their offensive potential. Most of the top ten are college catchers, while prep catchers dominate outside the top ten.

      Collins is one of the best bats in this draft. He has crushed the ball this year, hitting .364/.540/.630 with 66 walks to 44 strikeouts. There's still a chance he ends up at first base, but it's much smaller than many thought at the beginning of the year. He has put a lot of work into his defense, and with pro coaching I expect him to be a serviceable catcher. He should be gone in the top half of the first round, perhaps in the top ten picks.

      Thaiss is another college bat with great potential. He has a greater likelihood of moving from behind the plate than Collins, but his bat should play at first base as a high OBP with some pop, similar to Scott Hatteberg. But his pop is also underrated, as Virginia's home stadium is a difficult park for power. Because of that, he could morph into a Kevin Youkilis type. He's hitting .382/.477/.591 on the year, with 36 walks to only 14 strikeouts. He should be a first round pick, and could go in the top twenty picks.

      Okey was a big prospect out of high school, but was too strongly committed to Clemson. He's hitting .330/.450/.577 with 44 walks to 50 strikeouts. He should be able to stick behind the plate, and be a low BA, high K hitter with some pop. He should be gone by the end of the second round.

      Murphy is probably the best defensive catcher in this year's college draft prospect ranks. Jeff Ellis at ScoutingBaseball went so far as to say he's the top defensive player in the entire draft class. However, the bat is suspect, unlike the first three on the list. Hitting .258/.391/.472 at Wright State in the Horizon League isn't anything special, but he did miss 22 games when a hamate bone was broken by an errant pitch. He's a smart kid from an athletic family, as his father made it to Triple-A with the Indians in the 1980s. A team who focuses on catcher defense more than offense will gladly grab Murphy, likely in the first three rounds.

      Johnson and Rortvedt are the top two prep catchers, and head and shoulders above the rest of the prep catching pack. But they are highly ranked due to completely different strengths.

      Johnson is a glove-first catcher, who could end up the second best defensive catcher from this group. The glove is good enough that you could realistically put a floor on him as a big league backup. If the bat develops at all, say a 35 grade, he's a starter at the big league level for most teams. If he can become an average bat, he's an All-Star. He has a quick, short swing that has some potential. Pro coaching should be able to fix his lower half, which will help his bat develop. He should be gone in the first three rounds, possibly by the end of the second round.

      Rortvedt is a bat-first catching prospect. His defensive tools are good enough that he should be able to stick at catcher. And he's got one of the better prep bats in the class. He's got a good eye, and nice line drive power from the left side, with the potential to add home run power. He could be a player that surprises folks and sneaks into the back of the first round, but he should be gone by the end of the first three rounds.

      Cumberland has an underrated bat, hitting .344/.480/.678 with 38 walks to 40 strikeouts.Unfortunately, he may be the least likely to stick at catcher of this group (either he or Thaiss). Even at first base his bat has a chance to play, though. Switch hitters with pop from both sides of the plate don't grow on trees. And he's one of the youngest four year college guys eligible in this year's draft - he will be 20 years old until June 25th. I suspect he's gone in the top four rounds, perhaps as early as the second round.

      Ice is a late riser college prospect who could be four spots too low here (this group really are bunched up). He should be able to stick behind the plate, and the bat has been a revelation this year, after two meh seasons. He's hitting .310/.432/.563 with a very nice 37 walks to 25 strikeouts. If you buy the improvements at the plate, he's a top two rounds guy. If not, he still should be gone by the end of round four.

      Rogers is a glove-first guy - currently second-best glove in this top ten - with enough power potential to make things intriguing. This year, he's hit .260/.384/.398, besting his previous high OPS by almost 200 points. He did have a decent showing in the Cape last summer, hitting .274/.300/.425. But there are definitely enough questions about the bat that I wouldn't take him in the first five rounds.

      Feliciano is a lottery ticket that someone will pop higher than expected. It may be unlikely he sticks at catcher, but he has some impressive raw power. He's also one of the youngest players in the draft, as he will be 17 years, 6 months old at draft time. Put it all together, and he could be 5 spots too low on this list, and gone by the end of the second round.

      http://www.minorleagueball.com/2016/...ns-thaiss-okey

      Comment


      • #4
        The scoop
        The Rangers like athletic players who can play in the middle of the diamond, either at middle infield or in center field. They also like power arms, and they are not afraid to take chances on pitchers who are coming back from injury. The club also leans heavily toward the southeast part of the United States. The organization's last three top picks have been pitchers.

        First-round buzz
        MLB.com's Jim Callis has the Rangers taking Georgia high school outfielder Taylor Trammell, who was the state's Class A football player of the year. Callis also identifies two other Georgia high school possibilities: outfielder Will Benson and third baseman Joshua Lowe. Georgia has been a favorite spot for the Rangers over the past several years.

        Money matters
        Under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, each team has an allotted bonus pool equal to the sum of the values of that club's selections in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. The more picks a team has, and the earlier it picks, the larger the pool. The signing bonuses for a team's selections in the first 10 rounds, plus any bonus greater than $100,000 for a player taken after the 10th round, will apply toward the bonus-pool total.

        Any team going up to 5 percent over its allotted pool will be taxed at a 75 percent rate on the overage. A team that overspends by 5-10 percent gets a 75 percent tax plus the loss of a first-round pick. A team that goes 10-15 percent over its pool amount will be hit with a 100 percent penalty on the overage and the loss of a first- and second-round pick. Any overage of 15 percent or more gets a 100 percent tax plus the loss of first-round picks in the next two Drafts.

        To sign their first 10 picks, the Rangers have been allocated a pool total of $5,358,000, the fourth lowest among all MLB teams.

        The Rangers have the mantra of taking the best player available. At some point, it would be good if the best player available is a catcher. The Rangers are short behind the plate, although Triple-A catchers Patrick Cantwell and Brett Nicholas are having good seasons.

        http://m.rangers.mlb.com/news/articl...icid=167757330

        Comment


        • #5
          JJ Cooper ‏@jjcoop36
          Most upper level scouts/directors/GMs I talked to tonight think Perez will still be picked in the first round, even with positive test.


          Delvin Perez is clearly a top talent in this draft. To some, he is the top player in the draft. Yet he had slid because of character red flags even before this failed test. Then you take the attitude issues that were reported and add in drug use and, well, it makes his future murky. It takes a draft that was already jumbled and confusing and shakes it up some more.

          Perez is in a precarious situation here. He has no college commitment. He had no intention of going to school, which means he has no fallback.

          http://www.scout.com/mlb/scouting/st...ails-drug-test


          Will you take Delvin Perez at #30?

          Comment


          • #6
            i like the high school OFs around there

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mingjungtc View Post
              JJ Cooper ‏@jjcoop36
              Most upper level scouts/directors/GMs I talked to tonight think Perez will still be picked in the first round, even with positive test.


              Delvin Perez is clearly a top talent in this draft. To some, he is the top player in the draft. Yet he had slid because of character red flags even before this failed test. Then you take the attitude issues that were reported and add in drug use and, well, it makes his future murky. It takes a draft that was already jumbled and confusing and shakes it up some more.

              Perez is in a precarious situation here. He has no college commitment. He had no intention of going to school, which means he has no fallback.

              http://www.scout.com/mlb/scouting/st...ails-drug-test


              Will you take Delvin Perez at #30?
              yes I would.

              Comment


              • #8
                PED's are not typically an addiction, so I would consider him the first round. The only question is whether he is a top prospect due to the natural talent and work ethic or drugs.

                Comment


                • #9
                  16. Los Angeles Angels: C Matt Thaiss, Virginia
                  17. Houston Astros: RHP Forrest Whitley, Alamo Heights (Texas) HS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Cardinal Way ‏@STL_Cards_nut
                    Cardinals draft Delvin Perez with the 23rd overall pick of the 2016 draft

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Trammel or Dakota Hudson?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Cole Ragans, LHP, Tallahassee, Florida

                        Yet another high school pitcher to watch for the 2016 MLB Draft: Cole Ragans, a left-hander from North Florida Christian High School in Tallahassee, Florida.

                        Ragans is the opposite of a "pop-up" prospect: scouts have been watching him for years, perhaps resulting in a sense of prospect fatigue. He's been viewed as a top 2016 draft prospect since 2014 but despite holding his draft stock overall, reports are actually a bit mixed at times.

                        Physically, Ragans' potential is obvious: he's a 6-4, 190 pound athletic lefty with some physical projection remaining. His fastball is currently in the 89-93 range and that could end up a notch higher once he matures physically.

                        At his best, Ragans mixes the fastball with a strong curveball and change-up, both very good for a high school pitcher and projecting as at least major league average with a chance to be more. When he's going well he commands all three pitches with ease and generates scouting reports as being a highly-polished lefty with good stuff, worthy of a first round pick.

                        However, Ragans is not always consistent about this. Occasionally he loses the touch with his mechanics, impacting his command, sometimes hampering the quality of all three pitches. He can get away with this in high school but in pro ball it would be more troublesome. On those days he comes across as more of a raw "in need of development" type and more of a second round choice.

                        As a result of this inconsistency, opinion on Ragans depends on when people have seen him. He could very well go in the first round, but he could also drop to the second or even third round, at which point his signability would come into question.

                        He has a Florida State University commitment and is also one of the younger high school arms in the class; in other words, he has leverage. Ultimately his position on draft day will depend on what his bonus demands are and how teams assess his balance of potential and risk.

                        http://www.minorleagueball.com/2016/...hassee-florida



                        Scouting grades: Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 55 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 55 | Overall: 50
                        Many high school pitchers are raw and projectable. Some are more polished, with more pitchability than pure stuff. Ragans, a lefty from the Florida high school ranks, fits in the latter category.

                        Ragans looks and throws like a future big league starter. The 6-foot-3 southpaw has a good and clean delivery he repeats consistently, allowing him to throw his three-pitch mix for strikes. All of his offerings are a tick above-average, starting with a fastball he throws 89-93 mph with some angle and outstanding command. His curve is Major League average to a tick above and his changeup could be plus when all is said and done. Still growing into his body, there could be more in the tank.

                        Ragans threw extremely well in a big matchup against Trinity High School and fellow prospect J.C. Flowers, showing his best stuff of the year with a lot of people on hand to see it. That, combined with his overall feel for pitching, should have him primed to come off the board in the first few rounds.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          North Florida Christian High in Tallahassee, Fla., is quickly developing into a hot bed for high school talent. In 2014, two Eagles were drafted in the top four rounds: outfielder Matt Railey (third round, Diamondbacks) and lefthander Carson Sands (fourth round, Cubs).

                          North Florida Christian has another elite prospect in the 2015 class in Carson’s younger brother, Cole Sands, and in the 2016 class, lefthander Cole Ragans has a chance to develop into an elite talent as well.

                          Ragans’ appearance at Wrigley Field in August for the Under Armour All-America Game will hardly be his first exposure to high-level scouting. Ragans was one of the few underclassmen to make it onto an East Coast Pro roster in 2014, and he was more than up to the challenge. Pitching for the Braves team, Ragans worked 88-90 mph and touched 91 en route to a four-strikeout performance in the two-inning stint.

                          The junior has shown even more velocity in the past, bumping 93 at times with his fastball. Since then, Ragans has added some weight to his 6-foot-4 frame, and he projects to add more velocity in the coming years. Given the Tallahassee native’s advanced command and three-pitch mix, scouts can dream on Ragans’ potential.

                          At this point, the 2016 draft class appears to be extremely loaded with high school pitching. Several pitchers have shown Major League quality velocity, but few pitchers have shown the pitchability that Ragans has. As a sophomore in 2014, Ragans posted a 0.77 ERA and struck out 69 batters in 45 2/3 innings. His performance to date, and his projection, made him an easy pick for the Under Armour All-America Game on Aug. 15 at Wrigley Field. He was among the initial group of 13 players that Baseball Factory announced to the roster last month.

                          “It’s an honor, it really is,” Ragans said. “I still have a lot of work to do because you’re never good enough, there’s always room to improve.”

                          Despite his early success, Cole remains humble, and credits those around him with a lot of his success.

                          “My high school coaches—Mike Posey, Zach Cole, and in the past Micah Posey, they’ve had a big impact on me and helped me get where I am today. They’ve helped me tremendously. Also, my summer coach Matt Gerber, he’s helped me a lot, just getting me out there and they’ve all helped me become the player I am today and always pushed me to get better.”

                          Growing up attending Florida State baseball games, Ragans became a big fan of the Seminoles at a young age. “I’ve always dreamt of one day being able to there and play there,” he said. When the opportunity to commit to Florida State, it was an easy choice for Ragans and his family.

                          Ragans is aware of his potential, and has seen first-hand the hard work required of players to develop into draft prospects.

                          “I’ve just got to keep working hard and try to make my family proud,” he said.

                          http://www.baseballamerica.com/draft/armour-american-spotlight-cole-ragans/#9o7qsqzecOMzyIWM.99



                          Cole Ragans, LHP, Tallahassee, Florida

                          Yet another high school pitcher to watch for the 2016 MLB Draft: Cole Ragans, a left-hander from North Florida Christian High School in Tallahassee, Florida.

                          Ragans is the opposite of a "pop-up" prospect: scouts have been watching him for years, perhaps resulting in a sense of prospect fatigue. He's been viewed as a top 2016 draft prospect since 2014 but despite holding his draft stock overall, reports are actually a bit mixed at times.

                          Physically, Ragans' potential is obvious: he's a 6-4, 190 pound athletic lefty with some physical projection remaining. His fastball is currently in the 89-93 range and that could end up a notch higher once he matures physically.

                          At his best, Ragans mixes the fastball with a strong curveball and change-up, both very good for a high school pitcher and projecting as at least major league average with a chance to be more. When he's going well he commands all three pitches with ease and generates scouting reports as being a highly-polished lefty with good stuff, worthy of a first round pick.

                          However, Ragans is not always consistent about this. Occasionally he loses the touch with his mechanics, impacting his command, sometimes hampering the quality of all three pitches. He can get away with this in high school but in pro ball it would be more troublesome. On those days he comes across as more of a raw "in need of development" type and more of a second round choice.

                          As a result of this inconsistency, opinion on Ragans depends on when people have seen him. He could very well go in the first round, but he could also drop to the second or even third round, at which point his signability would come into question.

                          He has a Florida State University commitment and is also one of the younger high school arms in the class; in other words, he has leverage. Ultimately his position on draft day will depend on what his bonus demands are and how teams assess his balance of potential and risk.

                          http://www.minorleagueball.com/2016/...hassee-florida



                          Scouting grades: Fastball: 55 | Curveball: 55 | Changeup: 55 | Control: 55 | Overall: 50
                          Many high school pitchers are raw and projectable. Some are more polished, with more pitchability than pure stuff. Ragans, a lefty from the Florida high school ranks, fits in the latter category.

                          Ragans looks and throws like a future big league starter. The 6-foot-3 southpaw has a good and clean delivery he repeats consistently, allowing him to throw his three-pitch mix for strikes. All of his offerings are a tick above-average, starting with a fastball he throws 89-93 mph with some angle and outstanding command. His curve is Major League average to a tick above and his changeup could be plus when all is said and done. Still growing into his body, there could be more in the tank.

                          Ragans threw extremely well in a big matchup against Trinity High School and fellow prospect J.C. Flowers, showing his best stuff of the year with a lot of people on hand to see it. That, combined with his overall feel for pitching, should have him primed to come off the board in the first few rounds.

                          http://pinstripedprospects.com/inter...e-ragans-14244



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Asher Wildman ‏@AsherWildMan6
                            Just got off the phone with Cole Ragans. NFC pitcher tells me he is going to sign with the Rangers and not enroll at FSU.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'm only going off the short writeups and the videos that Scott emailed, but I love the stuff these two kids have. Ragans has better stuff in the video than the writeups say, his pitches have good movement for a LH and if he adds velocity he could be very good.

                              Speas has a FB that looks like it would play in the ML bullpen right now, the heater is obviously only one small part of pitching in the majors but Speas has a FB that can't be taught.

                              Comment

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