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  • Clayton Blackburn

    I love this pickup. He may never be a TORP, but I can see how a brothers death could sidetrack a young player. Once a top ten prospect in the Giants system.

  • #2
    Originally posted by BattleshipTx View Post
    I love this pickup. He may never be a TORP, but I can see how a brothers death could sidetrack a young player. Once a top ten prospect in the Giants system.
    Completely agree. Needed to upgrade our depth SP options, and he could still be a good long-term guy. He shoots to 7 or 8 on the depth chart immediately.
    The Texidor Tornado

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    • #3
      He seems like a guy who has reached a sticking point in his development for having spent 3 years in AAA. Maybe our minor league coaches can help him break through. At the same time, though, when you give up basically nothing for a pitcher, you shouldn't expect much. Hauschild, for example, is not worth our time and roster space despite getting him for free.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RangersBamBam View Post
        He seems like a guy who has reached a sticking point in his development for having spent 3 years in AAA. Maybe our minor league coaches can help him break through. At the same time, though, when you give up basically nothing for a pitcher, you shouldn't expect much. Hauschild, for example, is not worth our time and roster space despite getting him for free.
        It's way too early to say that about Hauschild, who is pitching in the majors for the first time and experiencing the learning curve that comes with that. While I would agree with anyone who says that he shouldn't be used in a close game until he proves he can get outs in low-leverage situations, he's got good stuff and throws strikes. Give him some time to figure out what he can and can't get away with at this level, and he could be a guy that helps us out in some role down the road.

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        • #5
          With all due respect, his secondary pitches which don't fool anyone combined with his 92 mph lack of movement fastball is enough for me to say that he is going back to the Astros at some point, and he'll probably never be good enough to pitch for their major league team.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RangersBamBam View Post
            With all due respect, his secondary pitches which don't fool anyone combined with his 92 mph lack of movement fastball is enough for me to say that he is going back to the Astros at some point, and he'll probably never be good enough to pitch for their major league team.
            Again, it's way too early to say this. His stuff has been good enough to average more than a strikeout per inning so far this season and average almost 8 K/9 for his professional career. His stuff is plenty good enough to get major league hitters out. What hasn't been so far is his command. Let's give him some time to get that ironed out before making bold declarations about what he is or is not.

            I remember watching C.J. Wilson in 2005 and asking myself, 'Why in the world do we keep giving this guy starts?' Fast forward six years and he's one of the best starters on two World Series teams. You don't give up on guys with ability. And Hauschild has ability. He just needs innings (preferably low-leverage ones) at the major league level to figure out how to attack these hitters and get them out. He may or may not ever figure that out. But there's no reason to give up on him until you have to, and he's most certainly "worth our time" right now.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RangersBamBam View Post
              With all due respect, his secondary pitches which don't fool anyone combined with his 92 mph lack of movement fastball is enough for me to say that he is going back to the Astros at some point, and he'll probably never be good enough to pitch for their major league team.
              if his fastball isnt getting movement it is because he is either overthrowing it or overgriping it. Not unusual for a young guy. His out pitch is the sinker. we will see if he can get it right. It was worth a flyer in any case. too small a sample size to make a determintaion

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dannyboy8517 View Post

                Again, it's way too early to say this. His stuff has been good enough to average more than a strikeout per inning so far this season and average almost 8 K/9 for his professional career. His stuff is plenty good enough to get major league hitters out. What hasn't been so far is his command. Let's give him some time to get that ironed out before making bold declarations about what he is or is not.

                I remember watching C.J. Wilson in 2005 and asking myself, 'Why in the world do we keep giving this guy starts?' Fast forward six years and he's one of the best starters on two World Series teams. You don't give up on guys with ability. And Hauschild has ability. He just needs innings (preferably low-leverage ones) at the major league level to figure out how to attack these hitters and get them out. He may or may not ever figure that out. But there's no reason to give up on him until you have to, and he's most certainly "worth our time" right now.
                we dont really have anyone to invest these innings in right now. when ross gets here we will likely have to shift a current starter into this role. Until then see what we have.

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                • #9
                  Lesson 1 for Hauschild- DONT SHAKE LUCROY OFF!!!

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                  • #10
                    I heard Andrew Friedman say yesterday that, other than true aces, starting pitching is the most overvalued asset in baseball. He said he didn't mean that you don't need starters, but rather the cost between #5 starters and #2, 3, and 4 starters weren't remotely worth it and you are better spending your money elsewhere to get wins. His strategy going forward is be willing to pay for your own ace, grow young starters - even if they are average or mediocre they are cheap, and stockpile #5 starters on short cheap contracts. He said you don't want guys who are going to be blown out all the time, but if they can give you 5 innings and 3ER and then turn it over to a good bullpen and you will win a lot of games.

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                    • #11
                      Prospect Retrospective: Clayton Blackburn

                      Clayton Blackburn is well known to Giants prospect watchers. He was drafted by the Giants in round 16 of the 2011 draft out of Edmonds, OK, warming the hearts of Giants draft and prospect watchers who had long criticized Brian Sabean and Co for not taking enough chances on the upside of HS prospects.

                      His pro debut with the rookie ball Arizona Giants was impressive to say the least: 3-1, 1.08, 33.1 IP, 0.81 BB/9, 8.10 K/9, GO/AO= 2.58. Scouting reports cautioned that his raw stuff was marginal and might not play at higher levels. Saber enthusiasts liked him better and thought maybe his stuff would develop as he got older and stronger. The one problem with that thinking was his already big body might not have any room to develop!

                      His first full season with the Low A Augusta Greenjackets in 2012 was almost as impressive: 8-4, 2.54, 131.1 IP, 1.13 BB/9, 9.80 K/9, GO/AO= 2.32. The K/9 was good, check. The BB/9 was excellent, check. The groundball tendency was also excellent, check. The Sabers were winning this one! 2013 found him in San Jose where he put up a line of 7-5, 3.65, 133 IP, 2.37 BB/9, 9.34 K/9, GO/AO= 1.54. The ERA was disappointing and the groundball rate took a hit, but the K's and BB's were still solid and the Cal League is a whole lot tougher for pitchers than the SAL.

                      He was plagued with some minor injury issues in 2014 but his numbers slightly rebounded in the pitcher-friendly Eastern League: 5-6, 3.29, 93.1 IP, 1.94 BB/9, 8.23 K/9, GO/AO= 1.95. Scouting reports continued to question his raw stuff and there were whispers of conditioning issues. The Giants promoted him to AAA for the 2015 season. He was roughed up early in the season but was dominant in the last 2 months and ended up with the best ERA for qualified pitchers in the PCL: 10-4, 2.85, 123 IP, 2.34 BB/9, 7.24 K/9, GO/AO= 1.59. Clayton attributed his success down the stretch to improved conditioning. He appeared to be nearing the top of the Giants SP depth chart. Sabers continued to like him better than the scouts.

                      He got a long look in spring training of 2016 but was ultimately sent back to AAA where his numbers slumped. When the Giants needed a starter to replace Matt Cain, Albert Suarez got the call. The stretch run of 2015 never materialized for Blackburn and he was clearly passed on the depth charts by Ty Blach even Chris Stratton with Tyler Beede and Andrew Suarez coming up fast from the lower minors. Clayton got hit hard in spring training of 2017 and his first start for Sacramento did not go well. When the Giants needed a 40 man roster spot for Tim Federowicz, they chose to DFA Blackburn, an move that ended with a trade to the Rangers for a low level IF prospect named Frandy De La Rosa. On social media, Clayton was happy to get a chance to pitch for the organization he rooted for as a kid. So what happened here? Were the scouts right all along and his stuff just not quite good enough? Did his conditioning regress from 2016? Did he go into an emotional funk when his terrific 2015 in AAA did not translate into an immediate MLB job? Perhaps it was all of the above, or just a big fat dose of bad luck. Hopefully he puts it back together in the Rangers organization and has some great experiences pitching for his dream team.

                      http://whenthegiantscometotown.blogs...blackburn.html
                      Last edited by mingjungtc; 04-18-2017, 01:22 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doug View Post
                        I heard Andrew Friedman say yesterday that, other than true aces, starting pitching is the most overvalued asset in baseball. He said he didn't mean that you don't need starters, but rather the cost between #5 starters and #2, 3, and 4 starters weren't remotely worth it and you are better spending your money elsewhere to get wins. His strategy going forward is be willing to pay for your own ace, grow young starters - even if they are average or mediocre they are cheap, and stockpile #5 starters on short cheap contracts. He said you don't want guys who are going to be blown out all the time, but if they can give you 5 innings and 3ER and then turn it over to a good bullpen and you will win a lot of games.
                        And yet his organization just gave 37-year-old Rich Hill a three-year contract.

                        While that's an interesting concept, and one I think could work in the regular season, you'll have a hard time winning playoff games doing that. The Royals from a few years ago played in two World Series and won one with a similar model, but they had three or four No. 3 starters as opposed to fours and fives.
                        Last edited by dannyboy8517; 04-18-2017, 03:20 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dannyboy8517 View Post

                          And yet his organization just gave 37-year-old Rich Hill a three-year contract.

                          While that's an interesting concept, and one I think could work in the regular season, you'll have a hard time winning playoff games doing that. The Royals from a few years ago played in two World Series and won one with a similar model, but they had three or four No. 3 starters as opposed to fours and fives.
                          The Hill contract is part of the education for him and why he is saying that. And, I think you short change what he is saying also. The Rangers went to two WS following this model.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dannyboy8517 View Post

                            And yet his organization just gave 37-year-old Rich Hill a three-year contract.

                            While that's an interesting concept, and one I think could work in the regular season, you'll have a hard time winning playoff games doing that. The Royals from a few years ago played in two World Series and won one with a similar model, but they had three or four No. 3 starters as opposed to fours and fives.
                            The Hill contract is part of the education for him and why he is saying that. And, I think you short change what he is saying also. The Rangers went to two WS following this model.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dannyboy8517 View Post

                              Again, it's way too early to say this. His stuff has been good enough to average more than a strikeout per inning so far this season and average almost 8 K/9 for his professional career. His stuff is plenty good enough to get major league hitters out. What hasn't been so far is his command. Let's give him some time to get that ironed out before making bold declarations about what he is or is not.

                              I remember watching C.J. Wilson in 2005 and asking myself, 'Why in the world do we keep giving this guy starts?' Fast forward six years and he's one of the best starters on two World Series teams. You don't give up on guys with ability. And Hauschild has ability. He just needs innings (preferably low-leverage ones) at the major league level to figure out how to attack these hitters and get them out. He may or may not ever figure that out. But there's no reason to give up on him until you have to, and he's most certainly "worth our time" right now.
                              He's straight garbage, Danny, and wasting a major league roster spot. Don't hold out hope for a big turnaround. I expect JD to cut him when the suitable time arrives, hopefully soon.

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