Our Advertisers Help Support The Newberg Report Adams & Company Real Estate - Exceptional Properities of North Texas    
On this day in baseball history - The Newberg Report

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

On this day in baseball history

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • On this day in baseball history

    Oct 23

    1910
    » Three Finger Brown comes back to face Jack Coombs, who takes a 2–1 lead into the 7th. The A's get to Brown for five runs and a 7–2 win. The crowd of 27,374 is the Series' largest. The A's .316 BA is a World Series record. For this World Series, cork-center balls were secretly used for the first time, and will be used in the ML starting next year. Previously, rubber center balls were used.

    1920
    » The Chicago grand jury indictment adds the names of former featherweight boxing champ Abe Attell, Hal Chase, and Bill Burns as go-betweens in the WS Black Sox scandal. Confessions, later repudiated, are signed by Ed Cicotte, Joe Jackson, Lefty Williams, and Happy Felsch.

    1923
    » Babe Ruth makes a post-season appearance in a Giants uniform, as the Giants defeat the Baltimore Orioles 9–0. Ruth hits a home run over the RF roof at the Polo Grounds. The game is a benefit for destitute former Giants owner John Day.

    1926
    » In South Bend, Indiana, the Babe Ruth All Stars, including Johnny Mostil, Marty McManus and Urban Shocker, beat the local South Bend Indians 7-3 in a game called after six innings because of a late start. The all stars were delayed two hours when their vehicle broke down, as researched by historian Kevin Paczkowski. The Babe is 3-for-4 and hits a home run estimated at 600 feet. In preparation for the Babe's visit, the local team stocked up on baseballs at a cost of $1.23 each: in Montreal on October 17, the Babe hit 36 into a nearby river, according to the South Bend Tribune, and the ensuing game had to be stopped for lack of balls. Babe's squad will tie tomorrow when the Indians pitch the Giants Fred Fitzsimmons, who lives nearby. Joining Freddie is Fred Lindstrom.

    1927
    » Bill Purdy, who hit .355 in his 2nd year with the Reds, scores a touchdown for the Green Bay Packers against the New York Yankees. Purdy's score comes on a 5-yard run.

    1931
    » Brooklyn announces Wilbert Robinson is through as manager and the club will be called the Robins only in the past tense. Max Carey, a no-nonsense sort, will take over next year.

    1934
    » P. K. Wrigley buys more shares in the Cubs and replaces William Walker as president. He gives player/manager Charlie Grimm complete control.

    1945
    » Dodger President, Branch Rickey, announces that Jackie Robinson has signed to play with Brooklyn's Triple A team in Montreal. The 26-year old Negro League star will be the first black player to play in organized baseball since 1884.

    1951
    » Branch Rickey contends that the farm system saved baseball during the Depression. He asks Congress for legislation that will protect it from monopoly suits.

    The AP picks Giant manager Leo Durocher as Manager of the Year.

    1973
    » Charlie Finley reveals that he will not release Dick Williams from his contract unless he receives adequate compensation from the team that signs him. Williams had resigned following the World Series victory two days earlier.

    1974
    » The Cubs trade sweet-swinging Billy Williams, a fixture at Wrigley for 16 years, to the A's for 2B Manny Trillo and pitchers Darold Knowles and Bob Locker.

    Wally Yonamine, an American of Japanese descent, becomes the only non-Japanese manager ever to win the Japan Series when his Chunichi Dragons beat the Lotte Orions.

    1979
    » Billy Martin is involved in a barroom altercation with Joseph Cooper, a Minnesota marshmallow salesman. Cooper requires 15 stitches to close a gash in his lip.

    1981
    » Despite an uncharacteristic poor performance (9 hits, seven walks) Fernando Valenzuela goes the distance in the Dodgers' 5–4 come-from-behind win. The deciding run scores on a double play. Starter Dave Righetti lasts just two innings, walking two and allowing five hits, but reliever George Frazier takes the loss. Ron Cey has a 3-run homer for LA. Starters Valenzuela and Righetti are the first two Rookies of the Year to oppose each other in the World Series since Willie Mays and Gil McDougald in 1951.

    Joe Torre signs a 3-year contract to manage the Braves.

    1993
    » In a dramatic finish, Joe Carter of the Blue Jays homers off of Mitch Williams with 2 men on base in the bottom of the 9th to give Toronto an 8-6 victory and the World Championship. Lenny Dykstra hits his 4th homer of the Series for the Phils. Paul Molitor is named the WS MVP.

    Mike Piazza is the unanimous choice for National League Rookie of the Year. Selected as a favor to a friend of Tommy Lasorda's on the 62nd round of the 1988 draft, Piazza is the first rookie since Walt Dropo in 1950 to hit .300, collect 30 homers, and 100 RBIs. No NL rookie has done that since Wally Berger in 1930.

    1995
    » The Cardinals hire Tony LaRussa as manager, replacing Mike Jorgenson.

    The Yankees name Bob Watson GM, replacing Gene Michael.

    Plans are approved for a new $320 million stadium for the Seattle Mariners.

    1996
    » The Yankees even the Series by scoring twice in the 10th inning for an 8-6 win. Jim Leyritz ties the game in the 8th with a home run off Mark Wohlers as the Braves blow a 6-run lead. John Wetteland saves the game for Graeme Lloyd.

    1997
    » Rookie Livan Hernandez wins for the second time as Florida holds off Cleveland for an 8-7 victory in Game 5. Down 8-4, the Indians fight back with three in the 9th but strand the tying runner on base. Moises Alou hits a 3-run homer for Florida, while Sandy Alomar matches him for the Tribe.

    2002
    » David Bell drives home a run in the bottom half of the 8th inning to lead the Giants to a 4–3 victory to even the Series at two games apiece. Troy Glaus homers for Anaheim and Todd Worrell gets the win in relief for the Giants.

    Lou Gehrig's consecutive games streak being broken by Cal Ripken Jr. in 1995 is voted as baseball's most memorable moment by the fan participating Major league baseball and MasterCard promotion. Hank Aaron breaking Babe Ruth's all-time home run record, Jackie Robinson becoming the first black to play in major league baseball, Mark McGwire breaking Roger Maris' single-season home run record and Lou Gehrig's farewell speech were also in the top five events selected by the fans.

    Joining Roberto Clemente and Thurman Munson, Darryl Kile will become the third player to appear on the 2003 Hall of Fame ballot before the mandatory five-year waiting period. The 33-year-old Cardinal pitcher, who died of heart disease, was found dead in his Chicago hotel room in June.

    2005
    For 14th time in World Series history, a walk off home run ends Game 2 as Scott Podsednik's ninth inning blast at Chicago’s U.S. Cellular Field beats the Astros, 7-6. In 1960, Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski was the first player to accomplish the feat as his game-ending homer makes the Pirates World Champions.

    On the verge of the first World Series game in Texas, much to the chagrin of the Astros, MLB rules Houston must play Game 3 of the Fall Classic with its Minute Maid Park roof open. During the regular season, the team had a much better record (38-17) when ballpark was enclosed than in games started in open air (15-11) .

    2006
    Extending his scoreless streak to 24 1/3 postseason innings, dating back to 2003 with the Twins, Kenny Rogers blanks the Cardinals for eight innings as the Tigers beat the Cardinals 3-1 to even the World Series at a game a piece. The "Gambler's" recent play-off success comes under suspicious as TV cameras spot an unknown dark spot on the right-hander's pitching hand in the first inning which he claims to be only mud

    resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

  • #2
    Great stuff!

    Two things:

    - Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown was from my home town.

    - The Indians' luck hasn't changed.

    :lol:

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by edcoffin
      Great stuff!

      Two things:

      - Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown was from my home town.
      The land of covered bridges?
      http://www.bbtia.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: On this day in baseball history

        Originally posted by bud

        1997
        » Rookie Livan Hernandez wins for the second time as Florida holds off Cleveland for an 8-7 victory in Game 5. Down 8-4, the Indians fight back with three in the 9th but strand the tying runner on base. Moises Alou hits a 3-run homer for Florida, while Sandy Alomar matches him for the Tribe.
        Also in 1997, Eric Gregg is found to have the largest strike zone known to man - giving Livan Hernandez the outside corner...of the batter's box. :wink:

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JasonParks
          Originally posted by edcoffin
          Great stuff!

          Two things:

          - Mordecai "Three Finger" Brown was from my home town.
          The land of covered bridges?
          Yep. Parke County (backwoods) followed by Terre Haute.

          Comment


          • #6
            Oct 25

            1911
            » Before 33,228 at the Polo Grounds, the Giants put three hits together off Coombs in the last of the 9th for two runs and a 3–3 tie. The A's Eddie Plank comes on in the 10th and gives up the winning run in the 4–3 contest. Relief specialist Doc Crandall gets the win after working two scoreless innings.

            1943
            » Dodger manager Leo Durocher signs his 1944 contract, which calls for a base salary of $20,000 plus $5,000 for every 100,000 fans over 600,000.

            1960
            » The Houston Colts announce that the team has hired Gabe Paul as GM. Paul will clash with majority owner Roy Hofheinz and will leave the following spring for Cleveland.

            1965
            » Leo Durocher becomes manager of the Cubs, replacing head coach Lou Klein (48-58).

            1973
            » The Cubs trade 6-time 20-game winner Ferguson Jenkins to the Rangers for 3B Bill Madlock and utility man Vic Harris. Fergie has led the Cubs in wins in each of the past seven seasons, the only pitcher ever to do so and then be traded. Meanwhile, the Giants trade 3-time home run champion Willie McCovey, a Giant since 1959, together with a minor leaguer, to the Padres for P Mike Caldwell.

            1978
            » The Padres Gaylord Perry becomes the first pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in each league. Perry copped the National League honors with a 21-6 record and a 2.72 ERA. his is the 13th straight season that Perry has won 15 or more games.

            1981
            » Back-to-back home runs by Pedro Guerrero and Steve Yeager off Yankee ace Ron Guidry give the Dodgers their 3rd consecutive win 2–1.

            After his club loses game five of the World Series, Yankee owner George Steinbrenner scuffles with two (he says) fans in a hotel elevator and emerges with a fat lip and a broken hand.

            1983
            » White Sox pitcher LaMarr Hoyt, who led the American League with 24 wins but whose 3.66 ERA was not among the league's 15 best, wins the AL Cy Young Award, beating out the Royals Dan Quisenberry and the Tigers Jack Morris.

            1985
            » The Angels announce that they will not offer 7-time batting champion Rod Carew a new contract for the 1986 season, effectively ending his 19-year career. Carew finishes with 3,053 hits and a .328 career batting average.

            The Blue Jays name 3B coach Jimy Williams manager, replacing Bobby Cox, who resigned to become GM of the Braves.

            1986
            » Trailing 5–3 with two out and no one on base in the bottom of the 10th inning, New York rallies to win game six of the World Series 6–5 and force a deciding 7th game. After Gary Carter, Kevin Mitchell, and Ray Knight single, Bob Stanley uncorks a wild pitch that permits the tying run to score, and a hobbled Bill Buckner lets Mookie Wilson's slow bouncer skip through his legs, allowing Knight to score the winning run. Reliever Calvin Schiraldi absorbs the loss.

            1987
            » Series MVP Frank Viola and reliever Jeff Reardon hold the Cardinals to six hits as the Twins capture game seven 4–2 to win their first World Championship in Minnesota. The franchise's last World Championship came in 1924 as the Washington Senators.

            1993
            » The American League matches the National League by making Tim Salmon the unanimous choice for Rookie of the Year. The Angels outfielder hit .283 with 31 homers and 95 RBIs.

            1995
            » Anheuser-Busch, which has owned the Cardinals for 42 years, announces plans to sell the team.

            The Braves take a 3-games-to-1 lead in the Series with a 5-2 win behind Steve Avery. Albert Belle, Manny Ramirez, and Ryan Klesko all homer.

            1997
            » Cleveland evens the Series for the 3rd time with a 4-1 victory behind Chad Ogea. Ogea helps himself with the bat, getting a single and double in two trips to the plate, and knocking in a pair of runs.

            2000
            » The Yankees defeat the Mets, 3-2, to take a commanding 3-games-to-1 lead in the Series. Derek Jeter homers off Bobby Jones on the 1st pitch of the game for the Bronx Bombers. The Yankee bullpen saves the game with four 1/3 innings of scoreless relief. Mike Piazza becomes the first player to hit a World Series home run at both Yankee Stadium and Shea Stadium. The backstop’s third inning homer off Denny Neagle are the only two runs the Mets will score .

            Yankees OF Darryl Strawberry is arrested and jailed after leaving a treatment center following a weekend drug binge.

            2005
            The first World Series game ever to be played in the state of Texas proves to be memorable as White Sox Geoff Blum’s 14th inning solo home run (3Oth MLer to hit a HR in first WS AB) becomes the beginning of the end of the longest Fall Classic contest ever played. The 7-5 victory, which gives the Chicago a commanding 3-0 advantage over the Astros, takes 5 hours, 41 minutes to complete and the 14 frames equals the number of innings the Red Sox needed to beat the Dodgers in Game 2 of the 1916 series.

            Mark Buehrle becomes first pitcher to start and save consecutive World Series contests. After receiving a no-decision starting Game 2, the 26-year old southpaw gets the final out in the 14th inning of Game 3 to record a save as the White Sox beat the Astros, 7-5.

            resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Oct 26

              1910
              » The Washington Post headlines a rumored trade with Walter Johnson going to Detroit for Ty Cobb. Detroit president Frank Navin scoffs at the story, saying he would never trade Cobb, but praising Johnson "as the best pitcher in the country."

              1911
              » Chief Bender cruises to his second victory, a 4-hit 13–2 breeze. The A's cap the win with a 7-run 7th, battering three tired Giant hurlers, Red Ames, Hooks Wiltse, and Rube Marquard. Overall, the Giants manage just 13 runs and a .175 BA off Chief Bender, Jack Coombs, and Eddie Plank. Because of the NL's extended playing season, this is the latest ending ever for a World Series, until the "Earthquake Series" of 1989.

              1917
              » Miller Huggins, who managed the Cardinals to a 3rd-place finish, is signed to run the Yankees by owner Jake Ruppert. Co-owner Til Huston, who favored Wilbert Robinson for the job, has a falling out with partner Ruppert and will sell his half interest to Ruppert in 1923.

              1923
              » Frank Chance signs to manage the White Sox replacing Kid Gleason, but he will resign February 17, 1924, because of illness. Coach Johnny Evers, named acting manager, will fill the job the entire season.

              1931
              » Charles Comiskey dies at age 72. The White Sox owner and a pioneer player, he never recovered from the betrayal of the 1919 WS.

              1940
              Tigers' slugging left fielder Hank Greenberg (.340, 41,150) is named the American League's Most Valuable Player with Indian hurler Bob Feller (27-11- 2.61) finishing second. Having won the award in 1935 as a first baseman, 'Hammerin' Hank' becomes the first player to win the MVP again playing a different position.

              1946
              » Columnist Westbrook Pegler writes a critical piece about the off-field relationship between Dodger manager Leo Durocher, actor George Raft and well-known gamblers. This is the first of a number of articles that will lead up to the suspension of Durocher for the 1947 season.

              1949
              » The San Francisco Seals (PCL), managed by Lefty O'Doul, finish a tour of the Orient that includes 5 games in Japan, one of which draws 100,000.

              1950
              » The Baseball Writers of America select Yankee SS Phil Rizzuto as the AL MVP.

              Branch Rickey resigns as president of the Brooklyn Dodgers and Walter O'Malley succeeds him. Rickey sells his 25 percent interest in the club for a reported $1.05 million.

              1960
              After operating the team in the nation's capital ever since Clark Griffith took over as manager of the club in 1912, Calvin Griffith, president of the Washington Senators, makes decision to move his club to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area.

              In a move designed to get a jump on the National League in the expansion race, the American League grants franchises to Washington and Los Angeles and okays the Senators move to Minnesota.

              1971
              » Vida Blue wins the American League Cy Young Award by a 98-85 margin over the Tigers Mickey Lolich. Blue was 24-8 for the A's, posting 301 strikeouts, eight shutouts, and a 1.82 ERA.

              Ferguson Jenkins wins the Cy Young Award in the National League.

              1979
              » Commissioner Kuhn notifies Hall of Famer Willie Mays that if he accepts a position with Bally Manufacturing Corporation, owner of several gambling casinos, he must disassociate himself from ML baseball. Mays, a part-time coach and goodwill ambassador for the Mets, will relinquish his duties upon accepting Bally's job offer on October 29th.

              1982
              » Steve Carlton wins the National League Cy Young Award for the 4th time, a record unmatched by any pitcher. The Phils 37-year-old lefthander, who led the NL in wins (23), innings (2952/3), strikeouts (286), and shutouts (6), was a previous winner in 1972, 1977, and 1980. He joins Walter Johnson and Willie Mays as the only players to be voted MVP or Cy Young winner 10 or more years apart.

              1985
              » Aided by a blown call, a bungled pop-up, and a passed ball, Kansas City scores two runs in the bottom of the 9th to beat St. Louis 2–1 and even the World Series at three games apiece. The Cardinals are three outs away from the World Championship when Jorge Orta reaches base on a disputed infield single. The next batter, Steve Balboni, lofts a foul pop that Clark loses track of and lets fall untouched, then singles. After Darrell Porter's passed ball puts runners on 2B and 3B and Hal McRae is intentionally walked to load the bases, pinch hitter Dane Iorg singles home two runs to end the game.

              1991
              » Minnesota evens the Series at three games each with a 4-3 win on Kirby Puckett's dramatic home run in the bottom half of the 11th inning.

              1992
              » The Rangers hire Kevin Kennedy as manager.

              1995
              » Cleveland stays alive with a 5-4 win in Game 5 of the WS. Orel Hershiser gets credit for the win, and Albert Belle, Jim Thome, Luis Polonia, and Ryan Klesko all reach the seats.

              1997
              » The Indians jump out to a 2-0 lead over Florida, but the Marlins claw their way back and tie the score in the bottom of the 9th on a sacrifice fly by Craig Counsell. In the last half of the 11th, SS Edgar Renteria gets his 3rd hit of the game, driving home Counsell with the winning run, as Florida wins Game seven by a score of 3-2. The Marlins thus become the fastest team in baseball history to win a World Series title, three years quicker than the 1969 Mets. P Livan Hernandez is named Most Valuable Player of the Series.

              1998
              » The Mets sign C Mike Piazza to a 7-year, $91 million contract, making him the highest–paid player in the game.

              1999
              » Down 5-1 in Game three of the World Series, the Yankees bounce back to defeat the Braves, 6-5 in 10 innings. OF Chad Curtis' leadoff home run in the bottom half of the inning -- his 2nd of the game -- is the game-winner. Tino Martinez and Chuck Knoblauch also homer for NY, with Knoblauch's 2-run blast in the 8th tying the score at 5-5. Mariano Rivera picks up the win for the Yankees, hurling two scoreless inning of relief.

              2000
              » The Yankees defeat the Mets, 4-2, to win their 26th World Series, 4-games-to-1. Luis Sojo's single in the top of the 9th drives home the winning run for NY. Bernie Williams and Derek Jeter homer for the Yankees, and Jeter is named the Series MVP. Derek Jeter becomes the first player to win the All-Star Game MVP and the World Series MVP honors in the same season.

              Joining Hall of Famers Joe McCarthy (7) , Casey Stengel (7) , Connie Mack (5) and Walter Alston (4), Yankee manager Joe Torre becomes only the fifth skipper to win four World Series championships.

              2002
              » When Russ Ortiz, tossing 5-0 shut-out strikes out Garret Anderson to begin the seventh, the Giants appeared destined to win their first World Series since 1954. Scoring six times in the 7th and 8th innings of Game 6, the Angels' rally from five runs down to stage the biggest comeback in Series history for a team facing elimination and beat the Giants, 6-5, forcing a Game 7.

              2004
              Prior to Game 3 of the World Series, Edgar Martinez receives the Roberto Clemente Award, an honor is given to the player who best exemplifies the game of baseball, sportsmanship, community involvement and the individual's contribution to his team. The Mariners designated hitter, a native of Puerto Rico like the award’s namesake, is involved Parent Project/Muscular Dystrophy, Children's Hospital, Make-A-Wish Foundation, and Big Brothers and Big Sisters.

              Curt Schilling becomes the first starting pitcher to win a World Series for three different teams. In addition to his Game 3 Red Sox victory over the Cardinals, his 8-2 lifetime post-season record includes wins for the Phillies (1993) and Diamondbacks (2002).

              2005
              Willie Harris scores the game’s only run in the eighth inning as Jermaine Dye, the series MVP, singles the pinch hitter home giving the White Sox a 1-0 victory over the Astros and the team its first World Championship since 1917. For the second consecutive year, an American League team sweeps its National League opponent.

              White Sox skipper Ozzie Guillen becomes the first foreign-born manager to win a World Series as the ‘Wizards of Ozzie’ sweep the Astros in the Fall Classic.

              2005
              Bobby Valentine becomes the first foreign manager to win the Japan Series in the 70-year history of Japanese baseball. Sweeping the Hanshin Tigers, the former Rangers and Mets skipper lead the Chiba Lotte Marines to their first league championship in 31 years.

              Tadahito Iguchi becomes the first Japanese native to win a World Series ring as the White Sox swept the Houston Astros to win the Fall Classic in 88 years. Leaving the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks, the second baseman signed as a free agent with Chicago prior to the start of the championship season.

              resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Oct 29

                1931
                » Lefty Grove, the A's P who won 31 games, is named the AL's MVP. He led the league in strikeouts for the 7th straight season and topped all pitchers in winning percentage, ERA, and complete games.

                Lefty Grove had a blazing fastball and a temper to match. By the time he had pitched 17 seasons, eking out a 300th win in his last appearance, both were gone. He arrived with a reputation for wrath, and led the American League in strikeouts seven consecutive years, victories four times (including 31 wins in 1931), ERA nine times (no one else ever did more than five), and winning percentage five times. Grove also led in shredded uniforms, kicked buckets, ripped-apart lockers, and alienated teammates.

                Grove tested the saintly patience of Connie Mack, a placid patriarch who won his last three pennants mostly by handing Grove the ball. Eventually, Grove gained control over himself and the ball. As a rookie, he led the league in walks as well as strikeouts. Later, he learned to win with pinpoint control and guile. Connie Mack explained, "Groves was a thrower until after we sold him to Boston and he hurt his arm. Then he learned to pitch."

                Mack called his star "Groves," for that's how Lefty's name appeared in box scores while pitching for Baltimore in the International League. He arrived there in the midst of a string of seven consecutive pennants, and Baltimore was not required to sell its stars to the majors. Grove was 25 before he could reach the Athletics, after Mack paid $100,600 for him, topping the flat $100,000 the Yankees had paid the Red Sox for Babe Ruth.

                The nine seasons Grove pitched for Philadelphia were his best. The team won three pennants, but crowds dwindled, tiring of victory and pinched by the ongoing Depression. Grove was sold to the suddenly rich Red Sox, whose new owner, Tom Yawkey, was buying up star players. Though Grove had led the league with 24 wins in 1933, his first year with Boston, 1934, was a sore-armed struggle. He bounced back in 1935 with his final 20-victory season, but won by craftily working hitters.

                Grove had largely overcome his uneasiness with strangers. He came, with a limited education, from a hard life in the bituminous hills of western Maryland. It took him time to adjust to being a national celebrity. When he had a rubber stamp made with his facsimile autograph, so as to accommodate as many fans as possible, he was branded an illiterate who couldn't write his name. If there was one thing he could write, it was his signature; it appeared on a string of lucrative contracts, first with Mack, then topped by Yawkey.

                Grove went home between seasons to the hardscrabble town of Lonaconing, MD, and opened a bowling alley that became the social center of the region. He retired to become a genial townsman, his hair turning white, weight added to his 6'3" frame. He would smile when reminded of stories of his once-terrible temper. He'd shake his head when someone spoke of the game he lost while trying for an AL record-breaking 17th consecutive victory in 1931. The A's failed to get him a run, and, after the game's only hit (a bloop single), a substitute outfielder misjudged an ordinary line drive, and the winning run scored. In later years, Grove would have forgiven the player who misjudged the ball, if he could have remembered his name. He never forgot, or forgave, star fielder Al Simmons, who had taken the day off to visit a doctor. Despite missing that record, Grove left behind a bevy of honors, including a batting record: he fanned 593 times, the most ever by a pitcher. His ultimate honor came with his 1947 induction into Cooperstown.

                1945
                » Happy Chandler, who had continued to serve in the U.S. Senate after becoming commissioner, resigns his political office. He will presently move the commissioner's quarters to Cincinnati.

                1949
                » Arguably their best trade ever, the White Sox send C Joe Tipton, who hit .204 in his one season in Chicago, to the Athletics for young Nellie Fox.

                Nellie Fox

                The 5'10" 160-lb Fox was long one of the top AL second basemen. After an unimpressive 1948 rookie season, Fox was traded to the White Sox for catcher Joe Tipton. He became a vital member of the Go-Go Sox for 14 seasons, noted for his tobacco-chewing and aggressive play. He withstood injury and illness to establish a record for consecutive games at second base, playing 798 straight (August 7, 1956 through September 3, 1960).

                Teaming first with Chico Carrasquel and then with Luis Aparicio, Fox gave the team strength up the middle. Hard work made him a reliable hitter (six .300-plus seasons) who rarely struck out. He led the AL in fewest strikeouts 11 times and he struck out only 216 times in 9232 career at-bats, the third-best percentage in ML history. In 1959, when the Sox won their first pennant in 40 years, he was AL MVP. The White Sox retired his uniform number, 2, and he was elected to the Hall of Fame by the veteran's committee in 1997. (RL)

                1959
                » Early Wynn of the White Sox wins the Cy Young Award, getting 13 of the 16 votes.

                1969
                » Tom Seaver is voted the National League Cy Young Award.

                An intelligent, hard-working perfectionist and the quintessential professional, Seaver was the first true star for the Mets and led them to their miracle World Championship in 1969. In his 10 years in New York from 1967 to 1977, he won 25% of the Mets' games. The 17th 300-game winner in major league history, Seaver set a major league record by striking out 200 or more hitters in 10 seasons, nine in a row from 1968 to 1976.

                Seaver came to the Mets via a strange lottery: In 1966, the Braves offered him $40,000, but the NCAA and baseball commissioner William Eckert voided the offer and made Seaver, still at USC, available to any team willing to match the Braves' offer. The Phillies, Indians, and Mets were willing and, in a drawing held in the commissioner's office, the Mets were picked out of a hat. Seaver was an immediate star, picked to the All-Star team in his first season when he won 16 games for a Met team that won just 61 games, and captured Rookie of the Year honors.

                In 1969 he won his first of three Cy Young Awards with a 25-7 record and a 2.21 ERA and led the NL in wins and winning percentage. On July 9, Seaver lost a perfect game when rookie Jimmy Qualls of the Cubs singled with one out in the ninth. The game was more important, however, since the Mets won 4-0, and began to make their move on the Cubs on their way to the World Championship. In Game One of the LCS against the Braves, Seaver was pinch hit for in the eighth inning, down 5-4, and emerged the winner over Phil Niekro as the Mets rallied for five runs. Seaver had less luck in Game One of the World Series, as he surrendered a homer to the Orioles' first batter, Don Buford, and lost 4-1. He came back to win a 2-1 ten-inning thriller in Game Four, helped by Ron Swoboda's game-saving catch in the ninth inning.

                Seaver picked up where he left off the next season. On April 22, 1970, he struck out 19 Padres, including a record 10 in a row to end the game, to tie the then-ML record for a nine-inning game, set by Steve Carlton. Although he didn't duplicate his 20-win season, he led the league in strikeouts (283) and ERA (2.81). Seaver himself felt that 1971 was his best season; he compiled a 20-10 record and led the league for the second year in a row in with a 1.76 ERA and 289 strikeouts.

                Overshadowed by Steve Carlton in 1972, in 1973 Seaver became the first non-20-game winner to win the Cy Young Award when he led the NL in ERA (2.08) and strikeouts (251) and tied for the lead in complete games (18) while leading the Mets to another improbable pennant. In Game One of the LCS, Seaver drove in the Mets' only run and almost made it stand for the victory, walking none and striking out 13, but he gave up solo homers to Pete Rose and Johnny Bench in the eighth and ninth innings to take the loss. The Mets' chronically weak offense often let him down during his career, but never so glaringly. He did come back in Game Five to win the clincher 7-2, giving up only one earned run. He took a no-decision in the Mets' 11-inning 3-2 loss in Game Three of the World Series, striking out 12 in eight innings. He pitched another strong game in the sixth contest, surrendering two runs in seven innings, but once again lost a tough one 3-1.

                A sore hip caused Seaver's worst season in 1974 with an 11-11 record and his first ERA over 3.00 (3.20). He bounced back in 1975 with his last great season for the Mets, going 22-9 and leading the league in strikeouts, wins, and winning percentage to capture another Cy Young trophy. In September, Seaver put together a seven-game winning streak, including another near no-hitter against the Cubs, broken up by Joe Wallis. By 1976, Seaver was having trouble with Met general manager M. Donald Grant over Seaver's salary and how the team was being run, and the two traded private and public taunts. On April 17, 1977, Seaver pitched his third one-hitter against the Cubs, a single in the fifth by Steve Ontiveros keeping him from the elusive no-hitter. Two months later, on June 15, the bomb dropped. Seaver was unceremoniously dealt to Cincinnati for four players, Pat Zachry, Doug Flynn, Steve Henderson, and Dan Norman, a trade that ripped out the hearts of New York fans. Seaver completed his last 20-win season with the Reds, finishing with a combined 21-6 mark and leading the NL with seven shutouts. Almost exactly a year from the trade, on June 16, 1978, Seaver finally got his no-hitter, blanking the Cardinals 4-0. Seaver had four winning years with the Reds, including 1979, when he went 16-6 and led the NL in winning percentage and shutouts (5). He took another tough no-decision in the LCS when he left Game One after eight innings tied 2-2 with the Pirates' John Candelaria; Pittsburgh won in the 11th inning. In the strike-shortened 1981 season, Seaver went 14-2 and led the majors in victories but lost a controversial Cy Young vote to rookie sensation Fernando Valenzuela.

                After Seaver slumped to 5-13 in 1982, the Reds completed the circle by trading The Franchise back to the Mets for three players. Although compiling only a 9-14 record (due mostly to the Mets' usual poor offense; his ERA was a better-than-average 3.55), fans were outraged when he was claimed by the White Sox after he was mysteriously left unprotected in the free agent compensation pool. He won 15 games for the White Sox in 1984, and 16 in 1985 when he set several career standards. On August 4 in Yankee Stadium, he won his 300th game, a 4-1 complete game on a six-hitter. On October 4, he moved past Walter Johnson into third place on the all-time strikeout list. After getting off to a slow start the following season, he was dealt to Boston (closer to his Greenwich, CT home), where he finished his career. An ankle injury prevented him from appearing against the Mets in the World Series, and the Red Sox released him following the season. Seaver tried to latch on with the Mets in 1987, but called it quits when he wasn't satisfied with his performance while getting into shape. After sitting out the 1988 season, Seaver was named to replace newly named National League president Bill White in the Yankee broadcast booth, and replaced Joe Garagiola for NBC Saturday telecasts with Vin Scully.

                1981
                » Bill Giles, the Phillies vice president for the past 11 years, heads a group of investors which purchases the club for just over $30 million, the highest price paid to date for a ML club. Giles is the son of longtime National League president Warren C. Giles.

                1985
                » Cardinals pitcher Joaquin Andujar is suspended for the first 10 games of the 1986 season as a result of his game seven tantrum during which he twice bumped home plate umpire Don Denkinger.

                1986
                » Padres pitcher LaMarr Hoyt is arrested at the U.S.-Mexico border for possession of illegal drugs, the 3rd time he has been arrested on drug charges. He will be sentenced to 45 days in jail on December 16th.

                1991
                Buck Showalter replaces Stump Merrill as the Yankee manager. During his four-year reign as the Bronx Bomber skipper, the 36-year old will compile a 313 -268 (.539) record capturing the AL manager of the Year award and AL East title in 1994 and first AL wild card the following year.

                2001
                Commissioner Bud Selig says major league baseball is considering eliminating two teams could by the start of next season. Contraction would include the Montreal Expos and either the Minnesota Twins or the Florida Marlins.

                Matt Williams becomes the first player in World Series history to hit home runs with three different teams. He homered in the Fall Classic for the Indians in 1997 and the Giants in 1989.

                2002
                Bringing the total to seven this month, three new managers are named including Ned Yost (Brewers), Ken Macha (A's) and Eric Wedge (Indians). Being younger than two of his players (Ellis Burks and Omar Vizquel), the Tribe's skipper, at the age of 34, becomes youngest manager in the major leagues.

                2006
                Silas Simmons, the oldest baseball player who ever lived, passes away at St. Petersburg's Westminster Suncoast retirement community in Florida. The 111-year old was a southpaw hurler in the Negro Leagues for 17 years played for the Homestead Grays, New York Lincoln Giants, and Cuban All-Stars.

                Silas Joseph "Si" Simmons (October 14, 1895? - October 29, 2006) was an American semi-professional and professional baseball player for African-American teams in the pre-Negro League era, and became the longest-lived professional baseball player in history. The previous record was held by Chet Hoff, who died at age 107 in 1998.

                Simmons was born in Middletown, Delaware. He was a five-foot-ten, left-handed pitcher/outfielder, and began playing for the Germantown Blue Ribbons, a semi-pro team, in 1911. In 1913, the Blue Ribbons became a professional team and were renamed the Homestead Grays, a team that quickly became a Negro League powerhouse.

                As late as 1926, Simmons pitched for the New York Lincoln Giants of the Eastern Colored League and appeared in at least one game in 1929 for the New York-based Cuban Stars (East) of the Negro National League. During his career, Simmons played on the same team as Hall of Famer Pop Lloyd and against Hall of Famers Judy Johnson and Biz Mackey.

                Simmons ended his baseball career soon after 1929. He and his wife Mary had five children and settled into life as a porter and eventually as an assistant manager at Rosenbaum's Department Store in Plainfield, New Jersey. In 1971, he retired to St. Petersburg, Florida, where he lived for the rest of his days. Simmons was married at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by Rev. John L. Lee September 15, 1915 to Mary L. "Mamie" Smith (July 19, 1896- ca. 1944) for 29 years until her death. Silas was then married in 1957 for 40 years to his second wife, Rebecca Jones (1901-1997), before her death August 20, 1997 at the age of 96. He outlived all 5 of his children and had 9 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.

                In the fall of 2005, baseball history buff and genealogist David Allen Lambert of the New England Historic Genealogical Society rediscovered Silas. Lambert alerted fellow baseball historians associated with the Negro Leagues, who proceeded to interview this link to early baseball. In May 2006, Dr. Layton Revel – founder of Texas-based Center for Negro League Baseball Research – met and interviewed Mr. Simmons. Dr. Revel organized the 111th birthday celebration for Simmons, in 2006. The celebration included around 30 former Negro League players from around Florida. A plaque was presented to Silas on his birthday on behalf of the Society for American Baseball Research by the genealogist David Allen Lambert. He was also presented a team jersey with number "111" from the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

                Simmons celebrated his last birthday on October 14, 2006, and died 15 days later at the Westminster Suncoast Nursing Home in St. Petersburg, Florida.

                resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com, Wikipedia, and baseballibrary.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oct 30

                  1911
                  » Clark Griffith is named manager at Washington, beginning a stand in the Capital as manager, then owner, that will last until his death in 1955.

                  1922
                  » The Giants pay $65,000 and 3 players to Baltimore for Jack Bentley, “another Babe Ruth.” Bentley hit .349 and was 13–1 as a pitcher in 1922 (41–5 since 1920). The 3 players are to be delivered by March 20, 1923, and if not satisfactory to Baltimore, the Giants will pay $2,500 per man instead.

                  In Game Five of the 1924 World Series, Bentley pitched the Giants to a 6-2 win over the Senators and hit a two-run homer off Walter Johnson. However, he lost Game Two 4-3 and dropped the finale in relief when Earl McNeely's double-play grounder hit a pebble and bounced over third baseman Fred Lindstrom's head in the 12th inning after two other fielding blunders.

                  Bentley was an excellent hitter; while going 13-8 in 1923, his first year with the Giants, he hit .427 in 89 at-bats, including a league-leading 10 pinch hits in 20 pinch at-bats. He had been acquired after going 41-5 in three years with the Baltimore Orioles of the International League. Also playing in the outfield and at first base, he had hit .349 for Baltimore in 1922 and was considered "the next Babe Ruth." After going 16-5 in 1924, weight problems took their toll in 1925, as he went 11-9 with a 5.04 ERA, and he was traded to the Phillies. Playing first base in Philadelphia, he hit .258 in 75 games, pitching only eight times, and returned to the Giants near the end of the season.

                  1945
                  » Branch Rickey signs Jackie Robinson to a Montreal (IL) contract for 1946. Black P John Wright also signs.

                  1956
                  » The Dodgers sell Ebbets Field to a real estate group. They agree to stay until 1959, with an option to stay until 1961.

                  1964
                  » Joe Stanka of the Nankai Hawks wins the Pacific League MVP award. With a season record of 26-7, Stanka pitched his team to three straight victories over the Yomiuri Giants to win the Japan Series. In his career with the Hawks (1960-65), and later with the Taiyo Whales (1966), he will win 100 games, the record for an American pitcher.

                  1967
                  » Arthur Allyn announces that his White Sox will play nine games in Milwaukee in 1968. Chicago will become the first American League team to play regular season games outside its own city since 1905.

                  1999
                  » The Rockies trade long-time favorite Dante Bichette to the Reds in exchange for OF Jeffrey Hammonds, P Stan Belinda, and cash. No word on the fate of Dante's Denver restaurant.

                  2000
                  Signing a three-year, $2 million contract, broadcaster Bob Brenly, 46, is named as manager of the Diamondbacks. The former major league catcher replaces Buck Showalter, the clubs' only manager, who was let go at the end of the season.

                  2001
                  » Roger Clemens and Mariano Rivera hurl the Yankees to a 2-1 victory in Game Three of the World Series. Jorge Posada homers for New York while Scott Brosius' 6th-inning single drives home the winning run. Brian Anderson takes the loss for Arizona.

                  George W. Bush becomes the eighth president to attend a World Series game and the first since Dwight D. Eisenhower to throw out the ceremonial first pitch. Wearing a New York Fire Department windbreaker in honor of the heroes of the September 11 attacks, the Commander in Chief walks to the mound by himself, gives a thumbs up, and throws a perfect strike to the Yankees' backup catcher much to the delight of the stadium faithful.

                  resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Oct 31

                    "...we Dodgers even disliked Halloween because its colors were orange and black." -DUKE SNIDER, Dodger outfielder joking about Brooklyn's intense rivalry with the Giants with team colors of orange and black.

                    1900
                    » Ban Johnson writes a letter to NL president Nick Young seeking peace, based on parity as a ML for the AL.

                    1933
                    » The St. Louis Cardinals release spitballer Burleigh Grimes.

                    Burleigh Grimes was the last legal spitball pitcher in the majors. In a 19-year career that ended in 1934, he often faked the spitter to keep batters guessing.

                    Grimes never shaved on days he pitched, because the slippery elm he chewed to increase saliva irritated his skin. His growth of stubble added to his ominous mound presence and led to his nickname, Ol' Stubblebeard. The belligerent pitcher never permitted a batter to dig in at the plate. It was said Grimes's idea of an intentional pass was four pitches at the batter's head.

                    During the 1920s, Grimes was a standout, twice leading the league in victories and five times topping the 20-win mark. He was durable, leading the league four times in starts and three times in innings pitched. After five straight winning seasons for Brooklyn, his 19 losses in 1925 topped the NL. Following a 12-13 mark in 1926, he was traded to the Giants and was 19-8 in his one season for New York. He peaked as a 25-game winner for Pittsburgh in 1928.

                    Grimes carried his cantankerous ways with him as manager of the Dodgers, though the team was rarely in a game long enough to make battling tactics pay off. He took over a bedraggled club that had frustrated Casey Stengel in 1937. His chances of developing a winner were undermined when new boss Larry McPhail brought shortstop Leo Durocher to the team. Grimes and Durocher were both battlers, but Durocher was brash and charming, while Grimes was simply pugnacious. Grimes was also frustrated when McPhail signed Babe Ruth as a first base coach and batting practice attraction. Ruth would belt ball after ball over the screen into Bedford Avenue, but his attention span would lapse in the first base coaching box. By 1939 Burleigh and the Babe were gone. Durocher began his managerial career and a new era came to Brooklyn.

                    A decade of minor league managing followed for Grimes, during which he never ceased his aggressive baseball behavior. Although he was a genial companion off the field, he raged at every close decision against his team. He was suspended in 1940 while managing Grand Rapids (Michigan State League) for an altercation with an umpire. He died of cancer at age 92, twenty-one years after the Veterans Committee selected him for Cooperstown.

                    1953
                    » After touring Japan with the Giants, Commissioner Ford Frick says that Japanese baseball is the equivalent of Class A in the U.S.

                    1957
                    » Yogi Berra says that the Yankees returned the money collected in fines to the players involved in the Copacabana fight.

                    By 1957, Billy Martin had already earned a stellar reputation as a pinstriped psychotic. But it was his brouhaha (along with teammates Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Hank Bauer and Whitey Ford) with fellow patrons of Manhattan’s exclusive Copacabana club that really put him on the map—and on the road.

                    George Weiss blamed Martin for the infamous altercation at the Copacabana, where several Yankees had gathered to celebrate Martin's 29th birthday on May 16, 1957. While it was Hank Bauer who decked a patron in the nightclub and Mantle and Ford were hardly unwilling participants in Martin's nightlife, Weiss dismissed the protestations of manager Casey Stengel and traded Martin to Kansas City a month later.

                    In four decades as a player, manager and mentor, Martin beat the snot out of two team traveling secretaries, a pile of players and fans, bouncers, sportswriters, a cabdriver, a marshmallow salesman and—most brutally—his liver. “A lot of people looked up to Billy,” Jim Bouton wrote in his memoir, Ball Four. “That’s because he just knocked them down.”

                    1961
                    » A federal judge rules that Birmingham, AL, laws against integrated playing fields are illegal, eliminating the last barrier against integration in the Southern Association.

                    1972
                    » Gaylord Perry wins the AL Cy Young award by a 64-58 margin over Chicago's Wilbur Wood. Perry won 24 games for the 5th-place Indians.

                    1973
                    » The Astros trade P Jerry Reuss to the Pirates for C Milt May. Reuss will finally put it all together in Pittsburgh and win 58 games in four seasons.

                    Tom Seaver wins the National League Cy Young Award, the first time the honor has gone to a player with fewer than 20 wins. Seaver was 19-10 and led the league in ERA (2.08) and strikeouts (251).

                    1995
                    » Cubs’ 2B Ryne Sandberg, who retired last year in the middle of a 4-year, $28.4 million contract, announces that he will return for the 1996 season.

                    2001
                    » In a thrilling contest, the Yankees defeat the Diamondbacks, 4-3 in 10 innings, to tie the Series at two games apiece. For the first time since Philadelphia A's Mule Haas hit a game-tying two-run homer in Game 5 of the 1929 World Series, a team comes from behind to tie a Fall Classic game in the ninth and goes on to win in extra innings. Tino Martinez's 2-out, 2-run home run in the bottom of the 9th ties the game, and Derek Jeter's blast in the bottom of the 10th wins it for New York. Both homers come off Byung-Hyun Kim who relieved Curt Schilling in the 8th inning. Mariano Rivera gets the win in relief for the Yankees.

                    2005
                    Although offered approximately $4.5 million for a three-year extension, four times the amount of his previous salary, Theo Epstein decides to leave the BoSox after being the youngest general manager to lead a team to a World Championship. The split with team president Larry Lucchino, who hired the 18-year Yale undergraduate as an Oriole intern, then gave him a position with the Padres before bringing the ‘Boy Wonder’ Boston, takes the Red Sox Nation by surprise.

                    2006
                    Joining Don Mattingly (Yankees,1987),Cal Ripken Jr. (Orioles,1991), Frank Thomas (White Sox, 1995), Jeff Bagwell (Astros, 1995), Manny Ramirez (Red Sox, 2002), Cardinals first baseman Albert Pujols becomes the sixth player to get a perfect score (100) in the annual player rankings. The Elias Sports Bureau rating, which was created as part of the settlement of the 1981 strike to determine compensation for the loss of a free agent, takes into account a player's plate appearances, batting average, on-base percentage, home runs and RBIs compared to others playing the same position during the two past seasons.

                    The Astros announce the club will not exercise their option on first baseman Jeff Bagwell for the 2007 season, paying instead the $7-million buyout of the first baseman's contract. The 38-year old perennial All-star, who played 2,150 games during his 15 seasons with the team,is the franchise all-time leader in home runs, RBIs and walks.

                    resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com,espn classics, and baseballibrary.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Happy Halloween Bud from everyone on the Rangers Board!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        hey menchie, thanks for the well wishes

                        hope y'all had a great Halloween, too

                        I've got pictures of Nina in her costume, I'll send them to you later

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nov 1

                          "You gotta to be a man to play baseball for a living, but you gotta to have a lot of little boy in you, too." -ROY CAMPANELLA, Dodger catcher

                          1892
                          » Averages for the first 154-game season show that Dan Brouthers of Brooklyn was the top hitter at .335, and Cy Young the top pitcher with 36 wins and 11 losses.

                          1894
                          » Former Providence P Charles Sweeney is convicted of manslaughter in San Francisco.

                          1906
                          » P John McCloskey, 3–2 with the Phils, has better luck off the field. An investment in the Cripple Creek, CO, mine pays off with a rich gold strike.

                          McCloskey was a catcher in the semi-pro Texas League who helped organize the professional Texas League in 1888. It was the first of five minor leagues he founded. He spent 36 seasons managing 30 different clubs, and, including his time as a player and umpire, he logged 44 years in organized ball.

                          1914
                          » Connie Mack begins cleaning house, asks waivers on Jack Coombs, Eddie Plank, and Chief Bender. Colby Jack goes to Brooklyn (National League). Plank and Bender escape Mack's maneuvering by jumping tfo the Federal League. Although all have some life left in their soupbones, they are near their careers' end, and departure is more sentimental than serious. Mack's excuse: retrenchment. Despite the pennant, Philadelphia fans did not support the A's and the club lost $50,000.

                          1916
                          » Harry H. Frazee, New York theater owner and producer, and Hugh Ward buy the Red Sox for $675,000 (one report puts the figure at $750,000) from Joseph Lannin. Bill Carrigan announces that he will retire as Red Sox manager to pursue his interests in Lewiston, Maine.

                          1918
                          » Outfielder Alex Burr is killed in France on his 25th birthday, the 3rd major leaguer to die of WWI. MLB players killed in WWI include Alex Burr, Larry Chappell (in eight days), Eddie Grant, Ralph Sharman, and Bun Troy. World War two ML casualties will be Elmer Gedeon, James Trimble and Harry O'Neill. Bob Neighbors will be listed as Missing in Action in Korea to complete the casualty list. There will be no ML players killed in Korea.

                          1922
                          » Former A's C Ira Thomas buys the Shreveport club in the Texas League for $75,000. Other former players who own pieces of minor league clubs include Ty Cobb (Augusta), Eddie Collins (Baltimore), and George Stallings (Rochester).

                          1942
                          » Larry MacPhail enters the army. The Dodgers look to St. Louis for leadership. After 2 decades in St. Louis, Branch Rickey splits with owner Sam Breadon. He will sign to become GM at Brooklyn.

                          Few executives had as profound an impact on the game as Larry MacPhail. In Cincinnati (1934-36) MacPhail introduced night baseball and commercial air travel to the majors. He laid the groundwork for the Reds' 1939-40 pennant winners, and he departed in controversy before they won, a trademark of his career. He went to Brooklyn in 1938. In his first year, the franchise made money for the first time since 1920. MacPhail hired Babe Ruth as coach to generate interest and, anticipating Charlie Finley years later, brought the "stitched lemon," a yellow baseball, to spring training.

                          MacPhail's presence inaugurated the modern era of Brooklyn baseball. In the 38 years before MacPhail, the Dodgers had won three pennants; in the 20 years following his arrival they won seven and lost in playoffs two times after finishing tied for first. MacPhail also brought Red Barber with him from Cincinnati to introduce daily game broadcasts in New York, ending a gentleman's agreement among the three local clubs not to do so.

                          In 1941, there was jubilation following the Dodgers' clinching of their first pennant in 21 years. In the excitement, MacPhail was left on a platform at the 125th Street Station, expecting to board the team train to meet a jubilant crowd at Grand Central Station. Manager Leo Durocher had decided to skip the stop in an attempt to keep the players on board. A furious MacPhail fired Durocher on the spot, something he did numerous times, many of which he seemed not to remember later. According to Durocher, "There is a thin line between genius and insanity, and in Larry's case it was sometimes so thin you could see him drifting back and forth."

                          MacPhail began as a protege of Branch Rickey, and Rickey replaced him in Brooklyn when MacPhail went into the army in 1942. MacPhail was a veteran of WWI as well, and had been in a group of plotters who had nearly succeeded in kidnapping Kaiser Wilhelm.

                          After the war, MacPhail joined the Yankees, and he had three managers (Joe McCarthy, Bill Dickey, and Johnny Neun) quit on him in 1946. He also came close to arranging what would have been one of the biggest trades in ML history while drinking with Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey. The pair allegedly agreed to swap Ted Williams for Joe DiMaggio, but when they sobered up Yawkey asked for Yogi Berra as well, and the deal was nixed.

                          Following the Yankees' victory over Rickey's Dodgers in the exciting 1947 Series, MacPhail upstaged the clubhouse victory party by unleashing a barrage of insults, punching a writer, and announcing his resignation in a drunken stupor. Topping Webb bought him out the next day.

                          The innovative, tempestuous MacPhail started a family baseball tradition. His son Lee became president of the American League, and his grandson Andy was general manager of the 1987 World Champion Minnesota Twins.

                          1943
                          » League statistics show the White Sox Luke Appling leading the AL hitters with .328, the lowest since Cobb hit .324 to lead in 1908. Conversely, of course, the pitchers' marks were topped by Spud Chandler's 1.64 ERA, the best since 1919. Spud also has the best percentage at .833, on a 20-4 won-lost mark. The White Sox aging OF Wally Moses stole 56 bases after stealing only 3 two years before. The veteran Mel Ott hits only .234 for his Giants, but he still has 18 homers -- all in the Polo Grounds.

                          1944
                          » Total attendance in the 2 leagues is 8.9 million. No team draws over a million, as Detroit leads with 923,000.

                          1946
                          » The right foot of Cleveland owner Bill Veeck is amputated, a result of a war injury in the South Pacific 2 years before. Veeck has had a tremendous impact on promotion in a half season of ownership. A minor but typical change is the regular posting of NL scores on the Cleveland scoreboard, a departure from the long-standing practice of both leagues.

                          1949
                          » Gillette buys the World Series television rights for $1.37 million, the money to be dedicated to the players pension fund.

                          1966
                          » Sandy Koufax becomes the first 3-time winner of the Cy Young Award. He is a unanimous winner for the 2nd-straight year. This is the last year that only one award is given for pitchers in both of the MLs.

                          1968
                          » Denny McLain is the unanimous American League winner of the Cy Young Award.

                          1982
                          » Thirty-eight-year-old Doug Rader, who spent the last three seasons as manager of the Padres' Triple-A farm club, will pilot the Texas Rangers. The former infielder becomes the club's 12th manager in its 12-year life.

                          1993
                          » Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott returns to take over the day-to-day operations of the Reds following her 9-month suspension for using racial and ethnic epithets.

                          1996
                          » The major league All-Star team opens their 8-game series in Japan with a 6–5 loss to the Japan All-Stars. Players include Cal Ripken, Sammy Sosa, Steve Finley, Brady Anderson, Mike Piazza, Hideo Nomo, Gary Sheffield, Alex Rodriguez, and Shane Reynolds.

                          1997
                          » The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum opens in its new home in Kansas City, Missouri. It had been occupying a temporary site there for four years.

                          2001
                          » In an amazing case of history repeating itself, the Yankees again come from two runs down with two outs in the 9th inning to defeat the Diamondbacks, 3-2 in 12 innings. Byung-Hyun Kim is again victimized, this time by Scott Brosius' 2-run home run in the 9th. Alfonso Soriano's single wins it in the 12th. Steve Finley and Rod Barajas homer in the 5th for Arizona's runs.

                          2006
                          In a move designed to prepare its next manager, the Yankees' promote hitting instructor Don Mattingly to bench coach to assist Joe Torre for next season. The Bronx Bomber All-Star first baseman replaces Lee Mazzilli, who will not be brought back by New York.

                          The Seibu Lions of the officially agree to release Daisuke Matsuzaka, giving the 26-year-old Japanese League pitching sensation an opportunity to play in the United States. It is reported the team plans to charge an American major league club $30 million just for rights to negotiate with the former 2006 World Baseball Classic and 2004 Olympic team standout.

                          resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nov 2

                            1881
                            » The American Association of Professionals is founded with the motto "Liberty to All." The members are St. Louis, Cincinnati, Louisville, Allegheny, Athletic, and Atlantic. This AA will be considered a major league.

                            1887
                            » The Athletics are sold to a syndicate headed by Henry C. Pennypacker. The three long time partners, Sharsig, Simmons, and Mason, still hold a sizable block of stock.

                            1899
                            » Henry Chadwick, called the "Father of Baseball," visits President McKinley in Washington to propose that Army regiments be provided with baseball equipment. This is Chadwick's first presidential interview since his visit with President Lincoln in 1861.

                            1913
                            » Former St. Louis Browns manager George Stovall is the first ML player to jump to the Federal League, signing to manage Kansas City. With glib salesman Jim Gilmore as its president, and backed by several millionaires, including oil magnate Harry Sinclair and Brooklyn baker Robert Ward, the Feds declare open war two weeks later by announcing they will not honor the ML's reserve clause. It will prove a long, costly struggle, similar to the American League's beginnings, but with more losers than winners.

                            1913
                            » Former St. Louis Browns manager George Stovall is the first ML player to jump to the Federal League, signing to manage Kansas City. With glib salesman Jim Gilmore as its president, and backed by several millionaires, including oil magnate Harry Sinclair and Brooklyn baker Robert Ward, the Feds declare open war two weeks later by announcing they will not honor the ML's reserve clause. It will prove a long, costly struggle, similar to the American League's beginnings, but with more losers than winners.

                            1930
                            » E.S. Barnard completes his 3-year contract as president of the American League. Among Barnard's innovations have been the establishment of an umpire's school and the recodifying of the rule book. He also led the effort to eliminate the sacrifice fly scoring rule (with inflated averages resulting from the livelier baseball, the batter no longer needed the benefit of not being charged a time at bat when his fly ball advanced a runner).

                            1937
                            » American League batting champ Charlie Gehringer is named MVP by the BBWAA receiving 78 out of a possible 80 points. Joe DiMaggio is a close second four points behind while Tiger teammate Hank Greenberg, who knocked in 183 runs, is a distant 3rd. Gehringer is the 3rd Tiger in four years to medal.

                            1944
                            Japan, where baseball has been banned as an undesirable enemy influence, mourns the death of Eiji Sawamura. The Japanese pitcher, who is killed in action in the Pacific, became a national hero by striking out Babe Ruth in an exhibition game.

                            1951
                            » The National Labor Relations Board files unfair labor practices charges against the Indians on a claim the club fired a ticket seller at the union's request. This is the first case against baseball under the Taft-Hartley Act.

                            The Labor-Management Relations Act, commonly known as the Taft-Hartley Act, is a United States federal law that greatly restricts the activities and power of labor unions. The Act, still largely in effect, was sponsored by Senator Robert Taft and Representative Fred A. Hartley, Jr. and passed over U.S. President Harry S. Truman's veto on June 23, 1947, establishing the act as a law. Truman had described the act as a "slave-labor bill", adding that it would "conflict with important principles of our democratic society".[citation needed] The Taft-Hartley Act amended the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA, also known as the Wagner Act), which Congress had passed in 1935.

                            1960
                            » Roger Maris nips Mickey Mantle for the American League's Most Valuable Player award, 225-222, the 2nd-closest vote ever, after the DiMaggio-Williams race in 1947.

                            1964
                            CBS becomes first corporate owner of a major league team buying eighty percent of Yankees for $11,200,000.

                            1974
                            » The Braves trade Hank Aaron to the Brewers for OF Dave May and a minor league pitcher to be named later. Aaron will finish his ML career in Milwaukee, where he started it in 1954. Meanwhile, Aaron, the home run king of American baseball, and Sadaharu Oh, his Japanese counterpart, square off for a home run contest at Korakuen Stadium. Aaron wins 10–9.

                            1979
                            » Nolan Ryan and Joe Morgan are the top names available in the reentry draft held at New York's Plaza Hotel.

                            1985
                            » The Expos finally sign their top draft pick, Pete Incaviglia, and then trade him to the Rangers for infielder Jim Anderson and a minor league pitcher. Incaviglia, who refused every chance to sign with Montreal, will blast a team-record seven homers in spring training.

                            1988
                            » Oakland SS Walt Weiss becomes the 3rd consecutive A's player to win the American League Rookie of the Year award, joining sluggers Jose Canseco (1986) and Mark McGwire (1987).

                            1995
                            » The Yankees name Joe Torre as their new manager, replacing Buck Showalter.

                            1996
                            » Toni Stone, the first female to play professional baseball at a big league level, dies at age 75. Stone played 2B for the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro League in 1953.

                            TONI STONE
                            aka Marcenia Lyle Alberga (real name)

                            Born: July 17, 1931
                            Died: Nov. 2, 1996

                            Second Baseman
                            1953 - Indianapolis Clowns
                            1954 - Kansas City Monarchs
                            1993 - Inducted to Women’s Sports Hall of Fame, Long Island, N.Y.

                            Toni Stone maybe one of the best ballplayer you've never heard of.

                            As a teenager she played with the local boy's teams,in St.Paul, Minnesota. During World War ll she moved to San Francisco, playing first with an American Legion team, and then with the San Francisco Sea Lions, a black, semi-pro barnstorming team. She drove in two runs in her first time up at bat.

                            She didn't feel that the owner was paying her what they'd originally agreed on, so when the team played in New Orleans, she jumped ship and joined the Black Pelicans. From there she went to the New Orleans Creoles, part of the Negro League minors, where she made $300 a month in 1949.

                            The local press reported that she made several unassisted double plays, and batted .265.( Although the all American Girls Baseball League was active at the time, Toni Stone was not eligible to play. The AAGBL was a "white only" League, so Toni played on otherwise all-male teams. In 1953, Syd Pollack, owner of the Indianapolis Clowns, signed Toni to play second base, a position that had been recently vacated when Hank Aaron was signed by the Boston (soon to be Milwaukee) Braves. Toni became the first woman to play in the Negro Leagues. The Clowns had begun as a gimmick team, much like the Harlem Globetrotters, known as much for their showmanship as their playing. But by the 50's they had toned down their antics and were playing straight baseball.

                            Although Pollack claimed he signed Toni Stone for her skill as a player, not as a publicity stunt, having her on the team didn't hurt revenues, which had been declining steadily since Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in the Majors, and many young black players left the Negro Leagues. Stone recalls that most of the men shunned her and gave her a hard time because she was a woman. She reflected that, " They didn't mean any harm and in their way they liked me. Just that I wasn't supposed to be there. They'd tell me to go home and fix my husband some biscuits or any damn thing. Just get the" hell away from here."

                            The team publicized Toni Stone in interviews on posters, and on the cover of the Clowns' program. And she got to play baseball, appearing in 50 games in 1953, and hitting .243. In 1954, Pollack sold her contract to the Kansas City Monarchs, an all-star team that had won several pennants in the "Colored World Series" and for whom Jackie Robinson and Satchel Paige had both played. When Stone left the Clowns, Pollack hired Connie Morgan to replace her at second base and signed a female pitcher, Mamie "peanut" Johnson, as well.

                            She played the 1954 season for the Monarchs, but she could read the hand writing on the wall. The Negro Leagues were coming to an end, so she retired at the end of the season. She was inducted into the Women's Sports Hall of Fame in 1993. She is Honored in two separate sections in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown; the "Women in Baseball" exhibit, and the Negro Leagues section.

                            Toni Stone's most memorable baseball moment came when she played against the lenendary Satchel Paige in 1953 " He was so good," she remembered, " That he'd ask batters where they wanted it, just so they'd have a chance. He'd ask '"You want it high? You want it low? You want it right in the middle? Just say. People still couldn't get a hit against him. So I get up there and he say, "hey, T, how do you like it? And I said, It doesn't matter just don't hurt me". When he wound up--he had these big old feet--all you could see was his shoe. I stood there shaking, but I got a hit. Right out over second base. Happiest moment in my life.

                            1999
                            » The Rangers trade OF Juan Gonzalez, P Danny Patterson and C Gregg Zaun to the Tigers in exchange for pitchers Justin Thompson, Alan Webb and Francisco Cordero, OF Gabe Kapler, C Bill Haselman, and IF Frank Catalanotto.

                            Seattle announces that superstar Ken Griffey Jr. is requesting a trade closer to his home. The Mariners agree to try to trade him during the off season.

                            The St. Paul voters reject a referendum on a sales tax increase to cover 1/3 of the $325 million needed for the stadium. The plan called for the Twins to pay 1/3 and the legislature would provide the funding for the other 1/3.

                            2000
                            After a 15-year big league career, first baseman Will Clark announces his retirement. 'The Thrill' ends his playing days with the McGwire-less Cardinals supplying the Redbirds with much needed offense (.345,12 HRs and 42 RBIs) in a two-month span after being traded from the Orioles.

                            Wrigley Field has been granted preliminary landmark status by the Commission on Chicago Landmarks. Any plans to refurbish or tear down Cubs' home since 1916 will have to be reviewed by this panel.

                            2004
                            After a grounds keeper finds a grenade in the Wrigley Field turf, police bomb and arson investigators are called to evaluate the right field discovery. The rusty, hollowed-out shell turns out to be harmless and its origins remain a mystery.

                            resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com, Wikipedia, Negro League Baseball Association, and baseballibrary.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nov 5

                              1901
                              » Sportsman's Park in St. Louis is leased for five years by Ban Johnson and Charles Comiskey for an American League team; two weeks later the Milwaukee franchise is officially transferred.

                              1914
                              » The Court of Appeals upholds a ban on Sunday baseball in Washington, DC.

                              1932
                              » Sacramento's Tony Freitas pitches the first night game no-hitter, stopping Oakland (PCL), 2–0, in nine innings.

                              1936
                              » Burleigh Grimes is named to the Dodger manager. The former Brooklyn spitballer will be replacing Casey Stengel who was fired last month during the World Series after compiling a 208-251(.453) during his four-year tenure.

                              1940
                              » Former Washington hurler Walter Johnson, who won 416 games for the Senators, goes down in defeat as a Republican candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives from Maryland.

                              Ty Cobb is supposed to have said that his greatest embarrassment was batting against Walter Johnson on a dark day in Washington. An uncommonly mellow acknowledgment of human frailty by cranky Ty, it was surely God's truth about gentle Walter. In an era lacking electronic speed guns, Johnson was generally thought to throw the fastest ball in the game. A 6'1" righthander with long arms, he threw his hummer with an easy sidearm motion. Contemporaries recalled his pitches as nearly invisible, arriving with a "swoosh" and smashing into the catcher's mitt like a thunderclap. In 21 seasons with the Washington Senators (10 in the second division), Johnson won 417 games. Only Cy Young won more (and only Young and Pud Galvin lost more). There was no pitching category in which he did not excel. In 1914, for example, he led the AL in wins, games, starts, complete games, innings, strikeouts, and shutouts. He eventually amassed 110 shutouts, the most ever. His 38 1-0 wins are, by far, an all-time record.

                              Among his accomplishments were 16 straight wins (1912); a string of 56 scoreless innings, and a 36-7 (1.09) mark in 1913; five wins, three of them shutouts, in nine days (1908); 66 triumphs over Detroit, the most for any AL pitcher against any one team; 200 victories in eight seasons, 300 in 14. He had his disappointments: 65 of his losses were by shutouts, 26 of them by 1-0 scores (both records); he lost six of eight duels with formidable Red Sox lefty Babe Ruth; and for all of Ty Cobb's dark-day embarrassments, he batted .335 in 67 games against Johnson.

                              Forgetting the numbers, what pleased people most was that Johnson combined extraordinary baseball talent with a wholly admirable character. In a rowdy game, he was mild, modest, decent, friendly, and forbearing. Across the nation, beyond the confines of baseball, he personified values that Americans respected. He persisted into the lively ball era and the Jazz Age with his old-fashioned, almost Lincolnesque virtues intact. Sportswriters rarely found him less than chivalric and dubbed him "Sir Walter" and the "White Knight."

                              He was Kansas-born of a farm family which ventured West to try its luck in the California oil fields. When Washington got him, he was going on twenty, and burning up a semi-pro league in southwestern Idaho. The story has it, a fan, a traveling liquor salesman, or an old-time umpire writing east about the young phenom, but only purse-poor Washington and its manager, Joe Cantillon, acted in time. Already interested in a fleet Western Association outfielder named Clyde Milan, Cantillon sent an injured catcher west to scout the pair. He corralled them both; Johnson signed for a $100 bonus, train fare, and a big league salary of $350 a month.

                              He was not an overnight success. The fastball was undeniable, but he was susceptible to the bunt and to the confusions of inexperience and an eighth-place club. After going 13-25 his third season (1909), he turned things around and became the AL's premier pitcher. For the Senators he was both starter and relief ace. Ultimately, he was 40-30 in relief, with 34 saves. The legend grew with him. He acquired nicknames deriving from the machinery that best exemplified the overwhelming speed of his fastball: "Barney," for Oldfield, the mile-a-minute auto racer; and "Big Train," for America's impressive, highballing railroads. Still, the image of the kindly fellow prevailed; one who, comfortably ahead in a late inning, might ease up to allow a weak batter or an old friend a hit; who never blamed teammates for losses, however grievously they erred; who never drank, cussed, or argued with umpires; who never deliberately threw at hitters, although his long career contributed to his setting the ML career mark with 206 hit batsmen. Cobb said he'd move up in the box and crowd the plate knowing he would never get a brush-back pitch from Sir Walter.

                              Johnson's control was exemplary. His catchers swore by him. In 802 games, he gave up a mere 1,405 walks, less than one every 4.1 innings. But he had wild streaks and still has a piece of the AL record for wild pitches in one season (21).

                              As the years wore on, Johnson became a Washington landmark. He was tempted during the Federal League uproar, and actually signed with the Chicago Whales, but revoked the contract when penny-pinching Clark Griffith made an emergency trip to Kansas to up the ante and restore him to his pedestal. Finally, in 1924, with the shrewdest trades of his life, Griffith put together Washington's first pennant winner. Going 23-7 at age thirty-seven, Johnson was finally in a World Series. His performance against the Giants in the seventh game is one of baseball's favorite stories. Appearing in relief, two days after pitching a complete game, he held the Giants scoreless for four innings until Early McNeely's 12th-inning grounder deflected off a pebble, over Freddie Lindstrom's head, allowing Washington's winning run to score. In 1925, with another 20 wins from Johnson, the Senators repeated. This time, after winning two from the Pirates, Johnson lost Game Seven. Rain and Roger Peckinpaugh's errors helped, but he was rapped for 15 hits and deserved the 9-7 loss.

                              When his glorious career wound down, Johnson tried his hand at managing: Newark for a season, Washington (1929-32), and Cleveland (1933-35). His .551 winning percentage was respectable, but the manager never measured up to the player. He was considered too easygoing. But he was among the select group admitted to the Hall of Fame when it first opened.

                              1968
                              » Denny McLain is the unanimous choice as American League MVP.

                              He was brash. He was flamboyant. He had a lounge act in Las Vegas. He performed on TV shows, including Ed Sullivan's. He paraded about in a white mink coat. He was Hall of Fame shortstop Lou Boudreau's son-in-law. He was also convicted of racketeering and smuggling cocaine and spent time in jail. And, for a while, Denny McLain was one of the finest pitchers in baseball.

                              In 1968 McLain was the league MVP and a unanimous Cy Young Award winner, going 31-6 with a 1.96 ERA, 28 complete games, and 280 strikeouts. He was the first 30-game winner since Dizzy Dean in 1934, and helped the Tigers to their first World Championship since 1945.

                              McLain first came up in 1963 and he showed early flashes of brilliance, winning 16 games in 1965, 20 in 1966, and 17 in 1967. He might have won 20 in 1967, if not for an unexplained accident at home where he hurt his toe and missed his last six starts. His teammates, manager, and Tiger fans thought he was dogging it, and he was blamed for the Tigers' close second-place finish in a wild, four-team scramble for the AL pennant.

                              Starting 1968, he could do nothing to erase the fans' memory of the previous season. He was booed at home after commenting that Detroit's fans were "the world's worst." But soon the victories started to pile up. He won nine straight starts from mid-June to mid-July to stretch his record to 18-2. On September 1, he converted a Boog Powell line drive into a triple play to preserve his 27th victory. He was in the dugout when he won his 30th, a 5-4 come-from-behind victory over Oakland. In his 31st victory, he had a 6-1 lead over the Yankees, so he grooved a pitch to Mickey Mantle in Mantle's last game in Tiger Stadium. Mantle crashed what would be his next-to-last career homer, passing Jimmie Foxx on the all-time home run list. McLain would have won 33 games if not for two consecutive 2-1 losses.

                              In the 1968 World Series, McLain lost both starts in which he opposed the Cardinals' Bob Gibson, who had won 22 games and set a major league record with a 1.12 ERA. But McLain won Game Six on two days' rest, setting up teammate Mickey Lolich to beat Gibson in the seventh game.

                              Many thought that his nonstop off-season partying would adversely affect McLain, but his lifestyle didn't stop Tiger management from awarding their cocky ace the team's first $100,000 contract. McLain responded by winning a second Cy Young Award (he shared it with the Orioles' Mike Cuellar) with a 24-9 mark and a team-record nine shutouts. But things started to unravel midway through the 1969 season. He angered manager Mayo Smith by not showing up until the fourth inning of the All-Star Game, which Smith wanted him to start. Then Sky King left before the game was over, flying out in his private Cessna.

                              In 1970 things fell apart. On April 1, Commissioner Bowie Kuhn suspended McLain for three months for a 1967 bookmaking incident. In August McLain filed for bankruptcy, then dumped ice water on a couple of Detroit writers. On September 9, Kuhn suspended him for the rest of the season for gun possession. Finally, on October 9, after a dismal 3-5, 4.65 season, he was traded to the Senators. Amid constant run-ins with no-nonsense Washington manager Ted Williams, McLain lost 22 games in 1971. He spent the 1972 season in Oakland and Atlanta. At the age of 28, his fastball and money were gone and his career was over. He put on weight. He tried several businesses, all of which failed. In the early 1980s, he spent over two years in jail before being granted a new trial and being released early in 1989. As he began to reassemble his life, he played the organ in a Michigan bar where Leon Spinks was the bartender, while listening to offers from promoters looking to get him back in the spotlight.

                              1976
                              » New American League franchises in Seattle and Toronto fill up their rosters by selecting 30 players apiece from unprotected players on other AL rosters. OF Ruppert Jones (Seattle) and IF-OF Bob Bailor (Toronto) are the first choices.

                              1992
                              » Former Pirate, Yankee and Mariner P Rod Scurry dies of cardiopulmonary arrest at age 36.

                              Scurry had one of the best curveballs of his day, but the ace reliever's career fell apart due to his cocaine habit. His best season was 1982, when he had 14 saves and a 1.74 ERA while going 4-5 for the Pirates.

                              Scurry pitched a seven-inning minor league no-hitter, beating Richmond 2-0 on July 25, 1977 while with Columbus (International League).

                              1996
                              » Yankee SS Derek Jeter is the unanimous choice for American League Rookie of the Year. Jeter was the Yanks Opening Day shortstop, the first rookie to start at SS for New York since Tom Tresh in 1962.

                              1997
                              » In what Bud Selig says is Phase one of a realignment of the major leagues, his Milwaukee Brewers move from the American League to the National League.

                              Davey Johnson resigns as manager of the Orioles just hours before he is named the American League Manager of the Year. Baltimore owner Peter Angelos had refused to give Johnson a vote of confidence after saying earlier that Johnson would be back in 1998.

                              1999
                              » After two days of play in the 1999 Intercontinental Cup tourney in Sydney, Australia, the USA has a 2–0 record. Yesterday, they won 4–0 over Japan by scoring four runs in the 9th, three on Dan Held's home run. Cuba beats Taiwan, 1–0, to avenge a loss yesterday to Cuba. Australia beats Italy after winning yesterday, 4–3 over the Netherlands, behind Shayne Bennett of the Expos.

                              resources for these posting are from nationalpastime.com and baseballibrary.com

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X