Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mitch Williams and Brandon McCarthy

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Mitch Williams and Brandon McCarthy

    I always admire McCarthy's intelligence:

    http://deadspin.com/brandon-mccarthy...iams-742712820

    MLB should hire McCarthy when his career is over to do a show with Williams. It would be total chaos!

  • #2
    A couple of thoughts about Mitch Williams. Yeah, he blabs so much that half the stuff that comes out of his mouth is really idiotic. I don't think of him as the best, most accurate sports reporter in baseball or anything. He is more of a "character." He's the kind of guy who entertains more than reports. I actually appreciate that about him. I enjoy listening to him knowing full well half of what he says is BS mostly for entertainment purposes and the other half contains some insight from the perspective of a former major-league pitcher.

    What I really like is that he's honest about his career. He says he was a "thrower" not a pitcher. Recently, he tweeted that he had 7.5 walks per nine innings in his career and no way the numbers would suggest he could have been a closer on paper. He said he's lucky he didn't have to play the game on paper.

    My thought about his pitching... he threw hard. Batters didn't know where the ball would go and thought it just might hit them. He won a lot because the batter were scared and uncomfortable, not because he made the best pitches.

    Anyway, I thought that 7.5 might be some typical Texas blowhard exaggeration. So, I looked it up. No, it was 7.1! LOL!! For his career!!!

    Yeah, how was he ever a major-league pitcher? I knew it was high because I had to suffer through watching it when he was a Ranger. But, that high? LOL.

    Anyway, when I hear him talk about hitting spots with the fastball, pitching inside and all of that, well... he didn't have one clue where the ball was going. He just reared back, closed his eyes, and threw as hard as he could. To hear him preach about hitting spots and pitching inside is just ridiculous. He never did any of that. If the ball went inside it was because that's where it went. If it hit a spot that helped his cause, it was pure luck. He sure didn't try to throw in any particular place, it always looked like to me, and if he did he wasn't successful at it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Flounder1 View Post
      A couple of thoughts about Mitch Williams. Yeah, he blabs so much that half the stuff that comes out of his mouth is really idiotic. I don't think of him as the best, most accurate sports reporter in baseball or anything. He is more of a "character." He's the kind of guy who entertains more than reports. I actually appreciate that about him. I enjoy listening to him knowing full well half of what he says is BS mostly for entertainment purposes and the other half contains some insight from the perspective of a former major-league pitcher.

      What I really like is that he's honest about his career. He says he was a "thrower" not a pitcher. Recently, he tweeted that he had 7.5 walks per nine innings in his career and no way the numbers would suggest he could have been a closer on paper. He said he's lucky he didn't have to play the game on paper.

      My thought about his pitching... he threw hard. Batters didn't know where the ball would go and thought it just might hit them. He won a lot because the batter were scared and uncomfortable, not because he made the best pitches.

      Anyway, I thought that 7.5 might be some typical Texas blowhard exaggeration. So, I looked it up. No, it was 7.1! LOL!! For his career!!!

      Yeah, how was he ever a major-league pitcher? I knew it was high because I had to suffer through watching it when he was a Ranger. But, that high? LOL.

      Anyway, when I hear him talk about hitting spots with the fastball, pitching inside and all of that, well... he didn't have one clue where the ball was going. He just reared back, closed his eyes, and threw as hard as he could. To hear him preach about hitting spots and pitching inside is just ridiculous. He never did any of that. If the ball went inside it was because that's where it went. If it hit a spot that helped his cause, it was pure luck. He sure didn't try to throw in any particular place, it always looked like to me, and if he did he wasn't successful at it.
      ......why is it ridiculous? Just because he couldn't do it doesn't mean he didn't know how important it is. I'm sure every pitching coach he ever had preached location and command to him, but unless you can master it, taking 2-3 MPH off your fastball will quickly get you a job selling insurance. Like I've said on other threads, should Charlie Lau and Rudy Jaramillo have never been hitting coaches because of their personal inabilities on the field?
      Upon acquiring Greg Goosen on waivers from the Dodgers, Mets Manager, Casey Stengel introduced him with "This is Greg Goosen. He's 19 years old, and in 10 years he's got a chance to be 29 ".

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Flounder1 View Post
        A couple of thoughts about Mitch Williams. Yeah, he blabs so much that half the stuff that comes out of his mouth is really idiotic. I don't think of him as the best, most accurate sports reporter in baseball or anything. He is more of a "character." He's the kind of guy who entertains more than reports. I actually appreciate that about him. I enjoy listening to him knowing full well half of what he says is BS mostly for entertainment purposes and the other half contains some insight from the perspective of a former major-league pitcher.

        What I really like is that he's honest about his career. He says he was a "thrower" not a pitcher. Recently, he tweeted that he had 7.5 walks per nine innings in his career and no way the numbers would suggest he could have been a closer on paper. He said he's lucky he didn't have to play the game on paper.

        My thought about his pitching... he threw hard. Batters didn't know where the ball would go and thought it just might hit them. He won a lot because the batter were scared and uncomfortable, not because he made the best pitches.

        Anyway, I thought that 7.5 might be some typical Texas blowhard exaggeration. So, I looked it up. No, it was 7.1! LOL!! For his career!!!

        Yeah, how was he ever a major-league pitcher? I knew it was high because I had to suffer through watching it when he was a Ranger. But, that high? LOL.

        Anyway, when I hear him talk about hitting spots with the fastball, pitching inside and all of that, well... he didn't have one clue where the ball was going. He just reared back, closed his eyes, and threw as hard as he could. To hear him preach about hitting spots and pitching inside is just ridiculous. He never did any of that. If the ball went inside it was because that's where it went. If it hit a spot that helped his cause, it was pure luck. He sure didn't try to throw in any particular place, it always looked like to me, and if he did he wasn't successful at it.
        Neither did you. So who are you to say?
        "The Bill of Rights, jazz music and baseball...That's all we'll be remembered for anyway."

        Comment


        • #5
          "The Padres thought I was a drug addict. They didn't think anyone sober could be that wild." Mitch Williams on minor league days SI 8/28/89
          "The Bill of Rights, jazz music and baseball...That's all we'll be remembered for anyway."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 363dp View Post
            "The Padres thought I was a drug addict. They didn't think anyone sober could be that wild." Mitch Williams on minor league days SI 8/28/89
            At least he admits he was wild. Yeah, it's true he can talk about it, but he sounds like it is easy. It wasn't easy for him.

            Comment


            • #7
              When he was pitching here, Mitch Williams surrendered a late lead to Boston, prompting the Angel Stadium fans to not only boo him but also flood the field with the souvenir seat cushions they had just been given.

              Afterward, I asked Williams about the animated reaction from the stands and, without even having to think about his response, he answered, “Luckily, it wasn’t bow-and-arrow night.”

              That, Josh, is one way to handle these things, Williams defusing the situation immediately after lighting the fuse and blowing up a potential Angels victory.

              http://www.ocregister.com/articles/h...ns-angels.html

              Comment

              Working...
              X