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  • Salary / MLBPA question

    (And to respark this part of the forum)

    The recent felony arrest of Milton Bradley raises an issue. If the Mariners decide to get rid of him on conduct causes, will they still owe him the remaining $12 million on his contract, or will they get that waived on termination with cause (not that this is near being resolved by the M's yet) ?

  • #2
    Standard boiler-plate language in any Major League contract states that if the player is convicted of a crime and is incarcerated, the team will not pay the player.

    The standard boiler-plate contract language was reported by AP.
    Under Section 7(b)(1) of the standard player contract, a team may terminate a contract if the player shall "fail, refuse or neglect to conform his personal conduct to the standards of good citizenship and good sportsmanship or to keep himself in first-class physical condition or to obey the club's training rules."
    Section 7(b)(3) gives the team the right to cancel the deal if a player shall "fail, refuse or neglect to render his services hereunder or in any manner materially breach this contract."


    The question would be whether or not simply being arrested for threatening a woman is good enough to qualify for the "good citizenship" clause in every contract. If he's not actually convicted, MLBPA would probably fight the termination and claim the M's still owe him money. If he actually gets convicted, especially if he gets jail time, they are much more likely to be able to cut him lose for free.
    "He's going to be an insta-out in our lineup for the next five (or six, sigh) seasons, so get used to seeing us trot out a guy who won't break .320 OBP in any season in a Ranger uniform." -Tythelip

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    • #3
      Bradley has a Uniform Player Contract (UPC), and while there are technically rules that allow for the voiding of UPCs on “good citizenship’’ violations, the reality is that never happens.

      Baseball’s history is that no matter what happens, this incident will not directly impact Bradley’s future with the Mariners. The club has been trying to deal him, but in the wake of his needing to take part of the 2010 season off to deal with anger management issues and with his salary being in eight figures, there hasn’t been much interest.

      In 2005 the Baltimore Orioles attempted to do that with pitcher Sidney Ponson. Between December, 2004 and August, 2005, Ponson was charged with assaulting a judge in his native Aruba, then twice was charged with driving under the influence, once in Florida and once in Maryland.

      After the last of those, the Orioles used the morals clause to release Ponson and void his contract, but the Major League Baseball Players Association filed a grievance on Ponson’s behalf. The two sides wound up settling before going to arbitration and Ponson reportedly got most of the $11.2 million he was owed on the contract.

      There are two clauses in baseball’s UPCs that would seem to give clubs the ability to terminate a contract. One is Paragraph 7(b)(1), which says the club can make such a move if a player “refuses or neglects to conform his personal conduct to the standards of good citizenship and good sportsmanship or to keep himself in first-class physical condition or to obey the club’s training rules.’’

      The other is Paragraph 7(b)(3), which gives clubs permission to void a contract if a player “fails, refuses or neglects to render his services hereunder or in any manner materially breach this contract.’’

      The trouble is, the MLBPA almost always files a grievance, and Major League clubs are reticent to have such cases in front of an arbitrator.

      http://mariners.sportspressnw.com/20...-after-arrest/

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